Off cuts and scraps, what do YOU do with them?

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Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #703540
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    So, aside from the obvious use as kindling, have any of you used any off cuts for making little gifts?
    I recently made some little mobile phone stands from some off cuts that I had lying around. Nothing fancy or difficult, just a bit of fairing, paring and smoothing. Folks seem to like them.

    Colin, Czech Rep.

    #703571
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    I’ve made block sets for the neighbor kids to play with
    There’s usually enough odd shapes you can get out of scraps. They probably are the only kids in the neighborhood with Cherry and walnut cubes in the sofa cushions..

    With som ingenuity you can also cobble up things like marble rolls.

    #704368
    Frank McGuire
    Participant

    I’ve made block sets for the neighbor kids to play with
    There’s usually enough odd shapes you can get out of scraps. They probably are the only kids in the neighborhood with Cherry and walnut cubes in the sofa cushions..

    With som ingenuity you can also cobble up things like marble rolls.

    Yeah, its a nice idea. I’ll try to do that

    #707100
    George Scales
    Participant

    You can make a sled for a table saw and cut into small squares and glue them up into a great end grain cutting board. I know a studio furniture maker in North Carolina who makes only about six pieces of bespoke furniture a year. His wife developed a series of earrings made of polished pieces. Combined, her income exceeds his in a year. It makes his furniture making business more than twice as profitable. personally I use my hard wood scraps for cutting boards, inlays, and walking canes.

    #718923
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    Was asked to make a couple of door stop wedges. Some simple square offcut stock provided the front pair. I had also cut off a gnarly knot from an otherwise nice plank, and when I looked at it, sitting there all lonely and socially distanced from it’s chums in the scrap pile, I thought ‘I can make you useful’, so a little clean up, trimming, splitting, shaping sanding and shellacing gave me the one at the back. Traded them all for a few kit-kat’s 🙂

    Colin, Czech Rep.

    #718935
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    To bolster my dropping confidence when projects go wrong, I make quick and simple things that work.

    This holder for a 3-connector wall socket extension lead, I made by planing an off-cut to the bevel of the connector, crosscutting it into four pieces, and gluing them pairwise. The holder sits on the apron/rail under the top of my workbench.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #719696
    sanford
    Participant

    Fun to try lots of little things, most of which do not work that well. Here is a letter opener made from some bits of oak. Its kinda of hard to get oak sharp enough to open letters well but it looks nice.

    #719893
    Paul Rowell
    Participant

    I wanted to have a go at bent laminations…

    IMG_20210705_204230

    #719908
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    …and created a very stylish piece of art.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #720033
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Many thanks for this thread, Colin. I really like it. So here’s another one

    There’s a thin line between a real mess at the workbench and a constructive chaos.

    A real mess or a creative chaos

    The timber yard is very generous with giving away form plywood in small sizes for free. I used one piece to make a jig for chiselling and planing long dovetails (rebates bevelled at 1:4); hoping that when these drawer runners were pressed into their sockets (housings/dadoes), they would align square and true with the rails of the drawer dividers. That they did, and as an additional benefit a real problem was solved. Bad cupping in the drawer sides was flattened out with these sliding dovetail drawer runners acting as crossbars.

    Flattening cabinet sides with drawer runners

    Serendipity works again.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #720102
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    I may have to copy that jig 🙂 Is there any taper to the jig, or would you add a taper to the dovetails with a sanding block?
    I made a set of bookshelves, loose-ish stopped sliding dovetails, no taper on a PC clone dovetail jig (power tools phase of my life 🙂 ), I also had cupped sides, and when I cut the grooves and did the dry fit, I clamped braces across the sides to flatten the cup out, assembled the shelves, then released the braces. The sides cupped again and locked the shelves solidly in place.

    Colin, Czech Rep.

    #720149
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    No, no taper. With the sockets well away from the edges of the sides, I didn’t think there would much of a risk that they would break, even if a part of a tail was pushing very much upwards and to the side. I did give the tails a little tiny “run-in”. When tapering, I follow Mr. Tom Fidgen’s recommendation: “Just take off a minute fraction on the tails, without any tapering of the sockets”. In all honesty, my talent for getting this joint loose, does not need the addition of tapering.

    There were several moments when setting up the table saw appeared as a most palatable alternative, but eventually I got the hang on how to cut. I began with a chisel that was resting on a piece of thick paper. That way I could pare off close to the line without undercutting. After that I alternated between a shoulder plane and the chisel, with very frequent tests of the fit.

    Next step is to make a 1:4 dovetail plane. Putting a bevelled fence on the rebate plane resulted in the open mouth of the plane tilting over the edge of the rebate, with some ugly tear outs.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

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