Rabbet Planes – which one?

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 37 total)
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  • #4630
    Dave
    Participant

    I’m looking for a rabbet plane and was wondering if anybody has used the veritas rabbet planes.

    -Canada

    #4631
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Dave,

    Funny enough a friend of mine just bought one, and he brought it down to show me. We set it up and tried it out, It is a  very nice plane. Fit and finish was 100% I don’t think you could go far wrong with it buddy.

    #4654

    I have the Veritas right handed rabbat plane and I prefer it above a power router. It’s a lovely tool though pretty hard to setup and use correctly. It’s very easy to create a slope. But I’ve read about such planes and it seems common. I can make a square cut but I have to pay close attention.

    #4655

    Little correction: it doesn’t seem common to create a slope but the difficulty of the setup 🙂

    #4656
    juryaan
    Participant

    I have the left hand version of the veritas skew rabbet plane.

    Made the rabbets on the back of the raised panel with this plane.

    Great plane .

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #4668
    John Guengerich Jr
    Participant

    I have an older Record Rabbet plane 078 I think. I like it. It has two post for the fence instead of thethe one post that Stanley and other clones of that day used. It isn’t as great on the cross-crain as the Veritas skewed planes but it is a very small fraction of the price on ebay and if you score the area, take shallow cuts, it still works very well.

    That said, I lust after the Veritas Skewed Rabbet/Rebate planes.

    #4670
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I often use a skew ironed Record #712 for cross grain work on raised panels, although I quite fancy test driving Veritas offering. 🙂  Other than that, the type of rebate plane I use varies depending on the work in hand, but you can quite often opt for a plough/combination plane, or fillister #78/#078/#778.  You seldom find exposed cross grain rebates, but maintaining a sharp edge and fine blade setting genuinely works wonders whenever a finer finish is desired, plus a finer cut tends to make rebating a comparatively effortless exercise in comparison to using a heavy cut.  🙂

    #4671
    psi
    Participant

    Scoring the grain by first moving the rebate plane backwards a couple of strokes made it much easier for me. Still can’t keep the rebates from sloping though (Stanley 78).

    Stupid is like stupid does, even here in rural Finland.

    #4672
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Pasi,

    Setting the iron so it stands very slightly proud of the side of the plane (At the shoulder of the rebate) helps the cut, while adding a wooden fence (10mm thick x 38mm deep) to the iron fence can help prevent sloping, but you also need to keep the fence firmly against the work piece. 🙂

    #4683
    kelly
    Participant

    Texas, USA

    #4684
    kelly
    Participant

    So, I gather from reading this thread, a skewed rabbit plane is preferred?  Is that correct?

    Does the skewed plane work with the grain and across the grain equally well?

    If one only purchased a skewed plane, would that be sufficient for most, if not all rabbiting tasks?

    Texas, USA

    #4685
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Chris Schwarz, thinks it’s one of the finest metal rabbeting planes ever made.

    http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/cSchwarz/z_art/vSkewRabbet/vSkewRabbet-1.asp

    #4699
    Brent Ingvardsen
    Participant

    I just received my pristine 044 from EBay. Can’t wait to run it through some wood and learn its particulars.

     

    Brent

    Meridianville, Alabama, USA

    #4700
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Brent,

    Some pics would be nice 🙂

    #4701
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Kelly,

    A skewed planing angle is of particular benefit when raising panels across grain, but isn’t a necessity when dealing with most concealed rebating work. 😉

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