Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • #139776
    tenjin
    Participant

    Hi,

    I’m restoring a No 3 plane. The iron and chip breaker were heavily rusted a deep brown colour (see photo).

    Rather than rub with sandpaper and risk damaging the metal, I soaked them in Diet Coke for 72 hours (see photo), scrubbing them with a wire brush every 24 hours.

    The transformation was amazing (see photo). The black and grey oxidisation is easily removed with fine sandpaper. The attached photo is prior to this removal.

    My question: does anyone know any reason why a Diet Coke bath might be bad for the metal? It seems fine at this point, but I’m wondering if it might, for example, affect the strength of the metal?

    When I was a kid we used this method to clean up our coin collections, but I never tried to plane wood with an old penny!

    Thanks

    Darren.

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by tenjin.
    • This topic was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by tenjin.
    • This topic was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by tenjin.
    • This topic was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by tenjin.
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    #139794
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    My thought is that the acid in a diet coke will not affect the underlying structure of the metal. It’will just react with the surface metal and rust. You should be fine with that. But I’m not a metallurgist or chemist …

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #139812
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    I’ve heard that some people are in the habit of actually drinking the stuff.

    #139814
    Eric Lundholm
    Participant

    Probably less acidic than vinager, Im not a metallurgist but cant see it hurting It sits in aluminium cans for months at a time.

    #139816

    Personally better to use White Vinegar! Con side is the smell. Pro side is around an hour or two wait in the bath against 3 days. Basically you are doing the same thing ie putting your metal in an acid bath. At least either Coke or vinegar have plenty other uses. I have read many times that the best toilet cleaner is Coke. Although Coke is not so good for sprinkling on your chips(French Fries). Go ahead use these very dilute acid liquids they will remove less metal than abrasives

    #139817
    tenjin
    Participant

    Thanks all.

    I can’t stand the smell of vinegar, so have been loathe to use it so far.

    Don’t like it on chips either! 🙂

    Regards

    Darren.

    #139821

    Sorry tenjin, but I thought I better also add when using your acid bath you are stripping away any oxide coat and getting down to bare metal. It will in no time flat start the rusting again without any protection. I don’t use WD40 for this even though I use it often it does not seem to have any lasting coating properties that I can see. Use a mineral oil or a wax. What you are trying to do is keep out the environment from your newly cleaned metal. As soon as you have the metal cleaned to a standard you like, coat it. You may even find that you have fingerprints in rust on your new surfaces if you wait. Some people have what used to be called acid fingers. This is due to the salts in their sweat. A long time back this was not such a problem due to the copious use of Tallow (an animal fat). Where Paul Sellers advocates the 3-in-one oil Tallow was used previously

    #139828
    Lucian T
    Participant

    Hi,

    The plane iron looks like a new one , amazing !

    Could we use the same method for saw plates? The benefit would be to avoid sanding paper .I am thinking on preserving the disston logo on one of my saws that needs restoring.

    Any thoughts on this?

    Thanks,
    Lucian

    #139829
    tenjin
    Participant

    I can tell you in a couple of days as I put an old tenon saw in Diet Coke yesterday!

    Regards

    Darren.

    #139830
    tenjin
    Participant

    Thanks sadlysenile, I will have a look. I have covered them in WD40, but will look at wax as I have some of the that on the bench.

    Thanks

    Darren.

    #139831
    Lucian T
    Participant

    Hi Darren,

    I wish you good luck with the tenon saw and please post some picture if possible 🙂
    If this is the case it will save us a lot of work and we will avoid scratches .

    Cheers,
    Lucian

    #139836
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @lucian – I typically use a bath of a weak citric acid for cleaning my rusted metal. About a table spoon of citric acid powder per gallon of water. I let it sit for three or four hours. Citric acid is used in canning fruits and veggies, so it can be found at grocery stores and hardware stores. The process leaves a black surface that needs to be wiped off and I usually follow up with some sanding with fine paper (400, 600 grit).

    I once did this on a rusty Disston cross-cut saw whose logo was not etched, but rather printed on the plate (probably a post 1970’s saw). Unfortunately the logo was completely gone. But the saw plate looked much better. An etched logo on the plate should not have the same problem. But be careful with the sanding part if you do that.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #139845
    tenjin
    Participant

    Hi Matt,

    Thanks for the suggestion of a citric acid bath. I’ve done some Googling and found this:

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Removing-Rust-with-Citric-Acid/?ALLSTEPS

    I’m going to give that a go. A few hours vs a few days makes all the difference.

    Regards

    Darren.

    #139899
    mechfish
    Participant

    I found some rave reviews for a product called Evapo-Rust and have been trying that. It seems to work nicely and, much like Diet Coke, it is not scary unless you try to drink it – it is biodegradable. I have wondered, though, if it is basically just citric acid plus a few handy additives.

    (The Evapo-Rust add copy claims it is “not an acid”, but I wonder if what they mean by that is “this is not one of those SCARY acids like naval jelly or phosphoric acid”, rather than “this is literally not acidic in any way”. Maybe I should find some litmus paper or a pH meter.)

    #139916
    tenjin
    Participant

    Hi,

    Here is the saw post-coke bath.
    It still required a good scrub with sandpaper. I will try the citric acid bath next.

    Regards

    Darren.

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