Simple Decorative Techniques

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
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  • #21588
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    I like simple techniques that can be done with a minimum of tools or supplies. A good example is Paul’s poor mans beading tool. One that I have found is a simple stamping tool made from a scrap of steel and filed to create a pattern that can be stamped into wood to create a visual depth. Another that I like to use is a simplified kolrosing technique. You simply incise lines into the wood with a sharp knife and then rub powdered coffee into those lines. I’ve included photos of a simulated drawer front to demonstrate. Its not my neatest work but demonstrates the concepts. I’ve also included a couple of photos of projects where I employed these techniques as well.
    If you know of other decorative techniques please share them.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    Attachments:
    #21596
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    You can also use the kolrosing technique for free form decoration.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    Attachments:
    #21599
    cpetersen1970
    Participant

    Really like the concept of the kolrosing technique. Almost anything you can draw is possible.

    #21600
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Exactly Chris. No special tools and no special skills needed.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #21602
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    I really like that free form leaf Greg, nice work!

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #21603
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Thanks Steve. Just throwing some things out there that I find useful and that everyone can do.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #21611
    mking1
    Participant

    Thanks for sharing this Greg. The stamping tool reminds me of those used to create similar patterns on leather. That might be an avenue worth exploring.

    On the kolrosing technique, is it coffee grounds or instant coffee you use? Does it need any special care in applying a finish over the top?

    Thanks, Martin

    #21623
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Hey Greg, can you elaborate a bit on the “powdered coffee”? Is that instant coffee? or is there something I am missing here? Thanks

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #21627
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Ok…you can use just about anything dry and powdery to darken the lines. I’ve used oil as a finish and also have used shellac with no issues.
    I just did the following sample in my kitchen then wiped it down with walnut oil.
    From left to right:
    coffee, instant coffee, tea, cinnamon

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    Attachments:
    #21630
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Thanks Greg, I am going to play around with that a bit.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #21690
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Your welcome Steve. Let me know what you think. Its one of those things that can comes in handy once in a while.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #21717

    Thanks for good idea Greg.I’m looking forward using it my running project))

    Toronto, Canada

    #21719
    DeniseG
    Participant

    Greg, this is terrific. Did you do the leaf using only a knife? How did you make the leaf outline lines heavier? A wider blade or just a deeper cut with the knife?

    Thank you for sharing the techniques. I’m crazy for the box lid with the “L”.

    i'd prefer to make it myself

    #21724
    NikonD80
    Participant

    Cheers for sharing this Greg. I’m definitely going to have a play with this technique and see how I get on. I think it’ll make some lovely Christmas decorations for starters.

    Jon

    P.S. I really love those spoons you’ve made.

    Keep Calm and have a Cup of Tea

    #21735
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Thanks everyone. Glad that you may find it useful.
    Denise @deniseg …all was done with a utility knife, its the same knife that I use for my joinery layout. Yes, you can very the line with the depth of the cut. Just experiment on a piece of scrap you will get the feel for it very quickly.
    The nice thing about using a dry powdery substance, like coffee, tea or cinnamon, is that you don’t effect the color of the wood. You can also darken the lines as you go to see if you have missed anything.
    Enjoy!
    PS…feel free to post photos here of samples so we can all learn from them.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

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