Steal for Scratch Stocks

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #554896
    sanford
    Participant

    I have been experimenting with scratch stocks and I wonder whether spring steal that is .032″ thick is adequate. I see that the blank Hock scratch stock blades are .05″. That is a pretty big difference. (I know — everyone says all you have to do is find old card scrapers or old, dead, useless saws from garbage cans behind flee markets to recover steal from. But I have already sacrificed my one extra scraper and there are very few used tools for sale where I live. The few junkers that exist in antique and junk sores are priced as if they were collectables. So I am considering buying some steal online. Advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!

Viewing 5 replies - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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  • #555154
    Gary Mercer
    Participant

    @gmercer_48083

    I made scratch stock to restore the sole of a bead plane, that was clamped in a jig that scraped a fresh profile into the sole. I used a paint scraper blade, sawed and filed and it worked great. This is the link

    #555155
    Gary Mercer
    Participant

    @gmercer_48083

    #555164
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    @lorenzojose

    Steel cut from an old hand saw was a traditional source. Also pieces of old bandsaw blades.

    Old rip saws like Disston number 7’s or 8’s were good. I see them sans handles for a buck or two in scrap yards. They were thicker than saws made after wwI.

    the band saw steel also was thicker than current versions, so saw mill band saws. Here in the pacific nw the supply is seemingly endless.

    They were also a source for scraper blades.

    #555252
    sanford
    Participant

    @sanford

    Thanks for the response. I will try to find scrap yards that have spring steel, although the ones I have seen in my region seem rather limited in this respect. (One guy in a junk yard laughed when I asked about old saw metal and such. He asked if I wanted some structural aluminum or washing machine motors instead. Sigh.) Thanks again.

    #555258
    Gary Mercer
    Participant

    @gmercer_48083

    Sanford, An old Sawzall blade is bi-metal, and can be used for scratch stock.

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