Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #654642
    Greg Cheng
    Participant

    Hello all,

    I am an amateur woodworker at best. Most of my knowledge is directly impart to Mr Sellers videos, books, and projects. I do mostly hand tool woodwork purely for the enjoyment of the process.

    I feel like I have noticed lately that my 250 grit diamond plate is losing its effectiveness. For instance I was restoring an old craftsman block plane. Trying to get down to a good edge on the plane iron took forever. Most of my tools are someone’s grand dad’s that I inherited and restored so is make sense that after wet/dry sandpaper the 250 grit diamond plate took the most abuse.

    Is this something that happens over time and I should consider replacing my diamond plate? or is it something else- like impatience?

    Thank you in advanced

    Greg

    #654700
    Stijn Bossuyt
    Participant

    Hi Greg,
    it’s normal that the diamond plates become finer grit through use. It could also be that they become clogged. Try washing the 250 plate with soap water and tooth brush first. My impression is that they cut faster again after this treatment. But I should also say that the 250 plate is not well suited for restoring bevels. I always use coarse sandpaper (80 grit or so) on granite for this. The quality of sandpaper makes a big difference. Cheap sandpaper looses its abrasive qualities much too quickly.

    #654727
    Greg Cheng
    Participant

    Thank you.

    I usually reshape the bevel using the wet/dry sand paper on a granite slab. I will try the washing it with soap and water. I usual fluid is class cleaner while working.

    Thank you for the tip and I will let you know what happens.

    #654739
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    A brisk scrub with Barkeepers friend , Bon Ami, or other powdered cleanser will also help clear a clogged plate. Use a proper lapping fluid. Paul recommends Auto Glass cleaner. I find a solution of Simple Green and water also works. You want something with a low surface tension.
    If you are into petrochemicals go for just kerosene or something really light. Many spray oils are too viscous.

    #654817
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    I have always used a pencil eraser to clean mine out. I got this when I bought a small honing plate for router bits from Trend many moons ago.
    I clean my plates at the end of each sharpening session.

    #654818
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    I had forgotten about the Trend eraser. I lost mine almost as soon as I got it!

    #654825
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    Yeah, wore my first one out a while ago. Now I just appropriate old ones from the kids school pencil cases.

    #654840
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    Large blocks of latex-rubber are available for cleaning the belts on belt-sanders.

    They are usually applied to the sander with the machine in motion so they’ll need some commensurate muscle cleaning diamond plates, but should work…….

    However, I’ve never used them myself, prefer kitchen scouring powder….. it’s easier and doesn’t damage your plates, unlike kitchen surfaces!

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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