Flat bottom holes with hand brace?

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  • #676041
    Jukka Huuskonen
    Participant

    Hi,

    I’m quite new to woodworking, but I started to wonder how do you get flat bottomed holes with hand brace? Can I use a forstner bit after first drilling it with auger bit or should I drill smaller, deeper hole to stop snail thread from pulling the auger bit down and just use it.

    The purpose would be for example to insert a hex nut/screw in there and having a flat bottom would make it easier to aligning it.

    -Jukka

    #676196
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    I’m trying to visualise what you want to finish up with……
    Are you making a hand-screw with a hex-headed bolt captive in a wooden block to form the handle?

    #676347
    Jukka Huuskonen
    Participant

    Yep, exactly that and some slightly different uses.
    With auger bit it’s always tilted one way or other. So a flat (and perpendicular to hole) bottom would be nice.

    #676348
    Jukka Huuskonen
    Participant

    Are links somehow disallowed here? My posts won’t get through if I have a link in them.

    #676354
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    Well, here’s how I’ve done it in the past to get to the next step which is a bolt embedded in a wooden block that is then shaped by hand or turned in a lathe – I’ve done both.

    I’ll emphasise that it needs some accurate drilling and cutting, but it is by no means a precision job. Easier to show than to write about, but here goes………

    Select your bolt. Measure the outer diameter of the thread. You’ll need a drill this exact size.

    Measure the distance across the flats (NOT THE POINTS) of the Hex head. You will need a drill this diameter – Ideally a Forstner type or a spur-point drill, ideally a drill without a long lead-screw. A flat bottom to the hole is nice to have but not essential in my opinion.

    The blank that forms the head needs to be in two pieces: The first is the larger and forms the back part. The second is the same size, but only ¼ inch – 6 mm – thick. If you have a single piece, cut a 1/4 inch slice from it. Alternatively you can contrast two different pieces and make a feature of it.

    Mark the centre of this thinner piece and drill it with the smaller drill, then smooth the sides flat and parallel.

    Drill a hole with the second, larger drill vertically into the centre of the larger piece as deep as the Hex head of the bolt – no more. The drilled hole needs to be central, upright and the depth of the bolt head – no more or less – don’t worry about being bang-on precise.

    Centre the bolt head as exactly as you can over the hole and mark the 6 sides equally around theedge with a knife point. With a small bevel-edge chisel, plunge each side vertically downwards to make a hexagonal hole that the bolt sits in a tightly as possible. At this point you can make the base of the hole as flat as you like, but It just needs to recess the bolt-head which will be entirely encased. Any slack bits can be filled with glue later.

    Take the other piece of wood and insert the bolt. Ensure that both faces mate evenly, Run the nut down the bolt to ensure that it sits vertically against the narrow piece and will be centrally located along the axis of the blank when you glue up. You can now bed the bolt head in the hole with some glue

    Align the grain with no gaps and complete the glue-up. If the faces are flat and from the same bit of wood, you should not see a glue joint and the nut will hold the bolt on its axis.

    Shape the wooden head as you wish.

    Good luck

    P.S. – I’m assuming that the grain runs at right angles to the bolt: If the grain is aligned to run in the same direction as the bolt, then you’ll need to consider a glue that will grip end-grain. Many glues are less effective in strength on end grain in my opinion.

    #676401
    Jukka Huuskonen
    Participant

    Hi and thanks for the info.

    That is actually pretty much how I did tightening nut for my special router plane build (special = needed it right next to a wall).

    I haven’t been able to post any links here, so I’ll try it without the ‘h t t p’ in front, just paste those links to address bar in browser :

    Here is address for my router plane build: photos.app.goo.gl/QZ2pv5L7Jy737H7u8

    And here is a link that shows the tightening nut in use: photos.app.goo.gl/ucybEdBpUTkkXnMq5

    I wonder if this post goes through…

    -Jukka

    EDITED: YAY, it went through!

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by Jukka Huuskonen. Reason: just commenting
    #676414
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Are links somehow disallowed here? My posts won’t get through if I have a link in them.

    My experience is you get one link.

    Two links and the posts don’t go through.

    #676438
    Selva
    Participant

    Posts with two or more links used to get tagged for moderation, I guess that’s still the case. If so, the post will show up when someone approves it.

    Selva

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 11 months ago by Selva.
    #676988
    Stewart Perry
    Participant

    That tool looks like it would be very useful for trimming tenons, due to its asymmetric design. I believe you’ve used a veritas router blade? And I assume a large eye bolt runs through the centre of the tool to the tightening nut?

    Nice work, thanks for sharing.

    Stu - Surrey, UK

    #676993
    Jukka Huuskonen
    Participant

    That tool looks like it would be very useful for trimming tenons, due to its asymmetric design. I believe you’ve used a veritas router blade? And I assume a large eye bolt runs through the centre of the tool to the tightening nut?

    Nice work, thanks for sharing.

    Thanks Stewart,
    No and yes.
    No: This is actually first router plane I’ve ever used.
    Yes: That bolt goes through to the tightening nut and a few centimetres past it.

    I’ve watched quite a few videos about router plane. This design was kind of inspired by Stumpy Nubs router plane build: https://youtu.be/ufDd8Oh4WLY

    It’s simplified, modified and at least so far uglyfied version of it. I’ll need to do some rounding there and probably some Danish oil on it, then I may take that uglyfied description off it 🙂

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