Goofy brush

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #143351
    Ed
    Participant

    I bought a fancy brush that is supposed to be a really good one, but the bristles divide up into fingers. See the photo. If I dunk it clean in water and swish it around, the bristles will attain their proper arrangement, but once I shake the water out it starts to do this, especially if I gently squeegee the water out with my fingers. It’s like the bristles are so fine that water tension binds them together.

    Has anyone seen this before or know how to deal with it? I’d like to use it for shellac and water borne finish.

    #143362
    ryan carr
    Participant

    never have seen that before, maybe its the new modern brush of the future. 🙂

    #143363
    Ed
    Participant

    It lets you paint three things at once!

    #143396
    Hugo Notti
    Participant

    Did you consider returning this brush for a normal one? i don’t think, that it splits by design.

    Dieter

    #143522
    cragglerock
    Participant

    Without taking it apart I couldn’t be 100% sure but I would guess this brush is made from three preformed tufts designed for smaller brushes (artist or signwriters onestroke). It looks to be very cheaply made so I hope you didn’t pay a lot for it? You will never get it conform into one, it will always split this way I’m afraid. If you did pay a lot I would indeed return it!

    For shellac I would recommend a natural haired brush, goat, squirrel, ox or Sorino (often misspelled zorino) flat or round according to your preference but traditional French polishers would most often use a round mop. For water based finishes a mop also works well but perhaps overkill expense wise.

    Regards

    Craig

    #143525
    Ed
    Participant

    Craig, I’ve heard of polishers using a “mop” but have been unsure what exactly that would be or where to look for one.

    I see why you would think this is three tufts from the photos, but it’s not and it will divide into other patterns. It seems it just has such fine bristles that the water tension causes this to happen.

    #143526
    cragglerock
    Participant

    Hi Ed

    Ah I see, they looked very uniform in the photograph. There’s still something amiss obviously although I suppose that this type of synthetic does tend to “clump” when wet somewhat. It’s horrible stuff to work with and use as a brush.

    I have attached a picture of a mop but I’m not sure where in the US you could get one. Or you could use a hake as Paul does which are made of goat and very inexpensive.

    I hope you find a solution anyway.

    All the best

    Craig

    #309948
    Edmund
    Participant

    Hi Ed

    I’m not sure from the photo, but some very fancy brushes (IIRC, usually with natural bristles or some blend) are not meant for use with water-based finishes. They end up exhibiting what you’ve got in the photo in the OP.

    So clean the brush and save it for use with oil-based finishes, which is what it’s intended for, I think.

    Here’s a great video from a professional wood finisher talking about this exact phenomenon, as well as much other useful info:

    #309997
    cragglerock
    Participant

    Hmmm I have to say his finish application looks good but some of the brush descriptions leave a lot to be desired!

    The “skunk” brush is actually hog bristle which has had a stripe dyed into it to make it look like badger, It’s claimed it contains bristle, badger and skunk but it looks like pure bristle to me. Also the white bristle brush is not black bristle dyed white, it is just white bristle.

    None of the brushes are cut into shape, they’re made that way to preserve the natural tips (which is what gives you a fine finish) if they were cut it would be very course indeed.

    I would be wary of using acetone for cleaning unless you know the brush is epoxy set. If they’re solvent set then the acetone is quickly going to eat at the adhesive and the stock will either break up or fall out of the ferrule altogether. In addition to gloves I would also wear eye protection especially if spinning the brush around. If using a brush for shellac you really don’t need to clean it anyway because a quick soak in shellac before you use it will soften it right up again.

    Last I wouldn’t personally use a wire brush to clean my brushes. Natural hair is going to be quickly broken, especially something fine like ox hair.

    Those synthetic Purdy Xl Elite brushes (not necessarily the angled one) are wonderful for oil based gloss though and leave a beautiful finish.

    Sorry to go on but I’ve been a brushmaker all my life, 30 years, and I get a bee in my bonnet when I see incorrect information being given. Rather like hand planes there’s an awful lot of waffle and sales pitch 😉

    I’m just waiting for a low angle brush to come out 😀

    Regards

    Craig

    #309998
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    I’m not sure from the photo, but some very fancy brushes (IIRC, usually with natural bristles or some blend) are not meant for use with water-based finishes. They end up exhibiting what you’ve got in the photo in the OP.

    My mom used to do a lot of watercolor and her brushes acted like that. They are meant for washes and not to hold heavy bodied paints. I now own them, and don’t quite know what to do with them.

    And as I recall, they cost a pretty penny, made of natural materials like sable, etc.

    #311751
    roofusson
    Participant

    This is not based on knowledge. Just guessing. it may be a graining brush. Cheers

    #311757
    cragglerock
    Participant

    I see where your guess is coming from but no it’s not a graining brush.

    #311758
    Ed
    Participant

    The bristles are “golden taklon,” which is a synthetic, so it ought to be fine for water born finishes. The bristles are exceptionally fine. I think this is just a poorly designed brush. The bristles lack the stiffness required to overcome the strength of the water tension, which makes the bristles clump.

    If you use this brush on a flat surface, it does a nice job if you work it out flat first to gather the bristles, but if you must work over a corner, moulding, etc., it’s a pain. I’ve used it with shellac a couple times and it does leave a nice surface (when it works). I’d guess the same would be true, if not truer, for water born finishes.

    I plan to reread @cragglerock ‘s post about brush types. This is likely a case of newer wasn’t better and using old and trusted methods will be better.

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