Honing Guide

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  • #622330
    Mark68
    Participant

    Hi all

    Does anyone know what the honing guide Paul uses, is called?

    At 1 minute in: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvABTtEwP08

    EDIT: I looks like this one (by Faitfull): http://www.amazon.co.uk/Faithfull-FAIHG-TB-Honing-Guide/dp/B000X2935S

    EDIT 2: And just because this is insanely priced: http://www.axminster.co.uk/lie-nielsen-honing-guide-101795

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #622503
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    It’s a type designed many decades ago by a company called ‘Eclipse’. Typically now called an ‘Eclipse Guide’

    The design has been copied variously over the years by all and sundry…. some good, most of indifferent quality; the main failing across all makes usually revolves around accurate holding of a wide range of chisel shapes and blade sizes.

    You have identified two pieces from both ends of the quality spectrum…….. the Lie-Nielsen holder is expensive, but as with all their kit, it is generally excellent quality.

    The Faithfull brand guide embodies all your expectations in an inexpensive, far-eastern made tool.

    There are plenty of original Eclipse guides available from time to time on a well-known auction site…… A well used original will usually indicate that it can be used well.

    Good luck

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by YrHenSaer.
    #622512
    Mark68
    Participant

    Thanks YrHenSaer

    I bought it for sharpening my Record 044 cutter. The chisels and planes I do by hand.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #622520
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    Interesting.

    I also sharpen by hand. My last episode with a guide involved a guide and I found that the main problem with all the guides that rely on a single narrow wheel was that it had a tendency to tip to one side, giving a slightly tilted bevel angle. On plough-blades, a right-angle across is essential.

    I gave up on that and revised my hand-sharpening technique for all narrow blades – say, narrower than 3/8 inch – by holding the blade in a hand vice and drawing the blade backwards down the stone (diamond in my case), not pushing forward at all.

    This has a number of advantages, I think:
    * You have better control of the blades posture on the stone by drawing back:
    * Angle corrections are easier to maintain:
    * The edge-wire is drawn out in a single line, instead of being compressed on each forward stroke. The advantage of this is that often the final stopping gives a straight, very narrow single wire remnant in one piece.

    The same idea works for chisels, as well.

    #622521
    Mark68
    Participant

    Good point. Makes you think why they did not use a second wheel.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #622524
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    I think that the single narrow wheel gives the option to ‘rock’ the blade to ease off each corner on plane blades.

    Veritas guides have a rear roller about 1-1/2 inch wide.
    Also incorporates an offset bearing that can raise the blade a degree or two to finish with a secondary bevel, if you are of that persuasion.
    Works well.

    #622620
    Ed
    Participant

    I use the eclipse style whenever a guide is needed and leave the Veritas in the drawer as much as possible.

    One thing to try is to use the coarsest abrasive you have to obtain a grinding angle, say around 25 degrees, maybe 30 for a bevel down blade. Then, readjust to 30 or 35 and go to your fine stone to get the actual cutting edge. Resharpen with just the finest stones as long as possible, then repeat. Using the coarsest abrasive means that fewer strokes are required to get the grinding angle, so you can focus on getting things square more easily.

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