Inlayed Frame

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  • #310270
    Peter GeorgePeter George
    Participant

    Here is my first attempt at an inlayed frame. The frame is roasted aspen and the inlay is soft maple. It’s finished with shellac and wax. I cut the grooves with the small plough plane and sized the inlay with an inlay scraper.

    Over all, I like it, but next time I’ll finish with T&T varnish oil. The oil finish seems to give a better colour and more depth to the roasted aspen.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

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  • #310273
    Paul DallenderPaul Dallender
    Participant

    @pompeyexile

    I’ve had several pictures framed by a professional framer here in York (England) and they both cost me a pretty penny I can tell you. Your attempt there is not just as as good, but far better; in fact I’d go as far as to say it’s stunning.

    I have several small antique prints and one very large one to frame and I’ve been holding off going to get them ‘professionally’ done, since taking up woodworking and seeing Paul’s video on frame making. What you have done there has convinced me even more to try to make them myself, and that these will be my first project once I’ve recovered fully from my broken arm, and if I make half as good a job as you have with yours, I’ll be (as we say here in northern England) chuffed to bits.

    Paul - A southern lad living up north - Nr York England

    #310274
    WesleyWesley
    Participant

    @weslee

    I agree, that frame looks absolutely gorgeous. Beautiful picture too.

    Never heard of an inlay scraper before to be honest but should really get one some day. I used an old pair of t+g planes like Paul demonstrates in the picture frame videos, but that took a lot of cleanup as I kept tearing the grain on the grooves.

    Wesley

    #310275
    Paul DallenderPaul Dallender
    Participant

    @pompeyexile

    Like you Wesley I too managed to buy an old set of matching T&G planes for the purpose of creating inlays as per Paul’s video. Would be interested to see what Peter means as anything that works would be useful to have in our woodworking technique arsenal.

    Also, obviously the T&G planes I have are one particular size but I guess come in various sizes. Is that the same for inlay scrapers?

    Paul - A southern lad living up north - Nr York England

    #310278
    Derek LongDerek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    Very nice, Peter. The inlay is very nice and crisp and sharp.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #310280
    Peter GeorgePeter George
    Participant

    @pjgeorge

    The inlay scraper is used for thicknessing the inlay material. I got mine from Lee Valley.

    I cut the grooves with the plough plane 1/8th inch wide and about 3/16th inch deep.

    My procedure to create the inlay material wast to start with a 2 inch x 1 inch strip, surface one wide face then rip it to rough thickness on the band saw. I then used the inlay scraper on the rough side to final thickness and then cut it to about 1/4 inch wide strips. I clamped a plane upside down in the vise and put a slight leading edge on the strips, put glue in the grooves and tapped the inlay into place (use a steel hammer) and clamp it down using a 1 x 2 board as a caul. After the glue is dry, it’s just a matter of planing the inlay flush.

    Two of the things I found critical are:

    1. The thickness of the inlay material. It needs to be a tight fit but if it’s too thick it pops out of the grooves or will not go in. I cut a test groove in a piece of scrap and used that to test the thickness until it just fit.

    2. The amount of glue in the groove. I ended up using a plumbers acid swab as a brush to just cover the bottom and sides of the groove with glue. Too little glue won’t hold and too much makes inserting the inlay problematic.

    It’s more complicated to describe than to do. I’d recommend to do as I did and practice on scrap wood until you are confident.

    Everything was done with hand tools except I used the band saw for the rip cuts and resawing.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #310281
    Derek LongDerek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    Good advice, Peter. I’ve wanted to toy around with doing inlay, but haven’t been confident enough making the strings to give it a go. A bandsaw probably makes it a lot easier.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #310304
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    Paul made an inlay scraper in class. I’ll see if I can find my notes. It was a card scraper, some scrap wood, and a C-clamp (G-cramp for some of us? 🙂

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