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Lidl Chisels

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Viewing 5 posts - 16 through 20 (of 20 total)
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  • #553494
    Nikolaj33
    Participant

    [quote quote=553309]@nikolaj33 the glass is likely fine, but if you are not gluing the paper down, I would not be surprised if the paper is curling as you work the back and causing the back to round into a belly. I always use spray adhesive when working the back. Some will hold the paper down by wetting it and placing the wet paper on the glass, but I find that isn’t adequate for me.[/quote]

    I saw Paul using just clamped sand paper on the granite block in one video, where he is flattening a sole of a plane, so I thought it could work for this too. I was looking for a short cut, because the sand paper I have looses the grit so quickly that I cannot achieve anything with one sheet. So gluing down makes things more time consuming, you gotta scrape off the glue etc.

    Another problem I was having was when flattening a sole of a plane I just bought. I had problem again to make it flat. It is a 30’s plane, the steel seems very hard. What I noticed after abrading it’s back for a bit that I didn’t get a simple abraded and not abraded zones, but rather a few different zones with different layers of abrading. I have spent again a couple of hours trying to make it flat, but it didn’t work. Do you think that maybe the problem actually might be that the surface isn’t flat after all?

    Maybe it is time to invest in those diamond stones, or at least a coarse one to begin with.

    #553498
    Ed
    Participant

    @nikolaj33 flattening a plane sole is very different from flattening a chisel or iron. On the plane, we actually want the edges to be curved so that they do not form sharp arises that catch the work. On the chisel, we don’t want to dub the corners because it makes it hard to get sharp all the way to the corner, although a strop can help with that.

    I find that sandpaper has much more grit than a diamond plate and will cut far faster, but as you say you must replace the paper frequently. I find that, if I give a very light application of spray adhesive to the paper and none on the granite plate, then the paper will stick, will not move around, but comes up off the granite with a fingernail and a tug. I give maybe one to three very brief sprays as I move the can across the paper, then let it dry for just half a minute. Actually, I just pick the paper up off of my spray mat, give a wave or two, and then put it on the granite. Maybe it’s half a minute of drying? I can change the paper dozens of times without cleaning the granite. Eventually, the granite gets enough residual adhesive on it that I’ll clean it. I try to start with 220 grit, but if that doesn’t seem enough, I’ll go down to 120. I try hard not to go lower than that because it can be very hard to get the scratches out, but sometimes I’ve gone lower.

    I realize this isn’t the “right” way to use spray adhesive, but that’s kind of the point. We don’t want a good bond, just good enough to keep the paper from curling while we work. You may see a video in which Paul works a chisel without gluing the paper down, but he’s working the bevel, not the back, and that makes all the difference.

    #553655
    Nikolaj33
    Participant

    Which kind of glue is that? Because the spray glue that I have definitely needs to be applied generously both on the paper and the surface as per manufacturers instructions. Otherwise it won’t stick.

    #553657
    Ed
    Participant

    It’s 3M 77 spray adhesive onto dry paper-backed abrasive (not cloth) and a granite block.

    #553662
    markh
    Participant

    Any spray adhesive from the stationary suppliers has worked for me. It doesn’t need to be a branded one – nonames work as well as the good ones. At a pinch, even spraying water underneath the wet and dry will work for a short while, if you press it down hard enough – but it will move eventually.

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