Record 050 Question

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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  • #715021
    Patrick Lundrigan
    Participant

    Larry,

    I don’t think a new depth guage or straightening the old one would work. I might not have mentioned it, but the beading stop is perpendicular and it also does not align with the skate.

    Since the hole is out of alignment, bending the depth stop to align with the skate would only work for one depth.

    #715022
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    So is the skate bent to one side?

    #715039
    Patrick Lundrigan
    Participant

    no, the skate is fine.

    #715052
    Benoît Van Noten
    Participant

    “While loose, the depth stop is almost in line, but once tightened, it goes out of perpendicular.”
    What about trying some cushioning material between the screw and rod. (leather?, copper? ) (not tested)

    #715055
    deanbecker
    Participant

    Looking at the pictures , the tilt to the side should not matter as long as the bottom is level across front to back. You can tape a sliver of wood to the bottom with dbl sided tape and plane flat. If you felt the need to completely level it plane both directions til its there. A rather simplistic fix but easily workablewith just bare essential tools, even sandpaper

    #715058
    Patrick Lundrigan
    Participant

    What about trying some cushioning material between the screw and rod. (leather?, copper? ) (not tested)

    that was something I was going to try, the slop is about ~1/32 and I need to find some shim stock or tape that won’t jam up.

    #715850
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    You could drill a little larger hole and pour one of the fuseable eutectic alloys that melt in boiling water as a bushing around the post.

    Look for cerrosafe, cerrobend, Wood’s metal, rose’s metal, and Field’s metal. They all have different melting temperatures and properties that make them melt at temperatures lower than any of the alloyed metals. Bismuth and sometimes indium are key metals. Ones with antimony will be harder.
    I’d avoid the ones with a lot of lead and cadmium.
    You can pour the metal around the post and they are soft enough you can drive the stop out when it sets. Then use a cylinder of Emory paper to slightly enlarge the hole so you can get the post back in. I think Cerrolow or Cerrosafe shrinks as it sets , then “grows” to its original size or a little more in an hour. It would be the easiest to use with the pour in place method.

    Stop leaks in the pour with ordinary putty. Coat the post with candle soot to prevent sticking. I used the metals a lot in my model rr days. Prototypers use them for bushings for moving parts.

    If you make a mistake just warm the plane with a hair dryer and start over.

    A bismuth – tin alloy used for fishing weights melts at 281° F, so hotter than boiling water, but still pretty low temp. And no heavy metals.

    Some Choices here:

    https://www.rotometals.com/low-melt-fusible-alloys/

    More choices at other sites selling fusible alloys.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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