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Two shooting boards

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  • #123872
    Peter George
    Participant

    Here’s two shooting boards that I made from some scrap baltic birch plywood. One is a dedicated mitre shooting board (I do a lot of picture frames) and the other one has a “donkey’s ear” that I can attach to it.

    I’ve been experimenting with some small boxes with mitred corners and the donkey’s ear works perfectly for that.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

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    #123876
    Frank Joseph
    Member

    Hi Peter
    You did a good job on them. They are important adds in the shop, they will give you good service , if I may suggest give the runner a GOOD coat of wax. And keep them well wàxed. At least I have found it makes a big difference in how well they work.
    Frankj

    In South Jersey the good part of New Jersey, USA.

    #123877
    dwaugh
    Participant

    They look great! I use mine all the time and love it (mostly because I can’t saw straight and the shooting board helps fix things).

    #123885
    Peter George
    Participant

    I had some UHMW (low friction) tape left over from another project, so I applied that to the runners. So far, it’s working very well.

    I love that the shooting boards allow me to get better precision and quality of cut than I get from the table saw. One more step toward hand tools only. 🙂

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #123929
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    These look great, Peter. Did you get the 45’s perfect with a combination square?

    I’ve had shooting boards on my list for quite some time. My old crappy one isn’t giving perfectly square cuts anymore, so I have to shim the fence with a piece of paper.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #123934
    Peter George
    Participant

    Actually, I cheated. 🙂

    I didn’t do any joinery. The base on both is 1/2 inch baltic birch plywood. I applied a 1/4 inch piece to form the track. The fences are built up of two layers of 3/4 inch. I took a page from Paul’s book and stuck everything together with double sided tape which I clamped in the vise for good adhesion. It took me about an hour and a half for both, most of that was ensuring that everything was square.

    The trick with the mitre board is to make sure the angle at the point is exactly 90 degrees. That way, if you shoot one side of the mitre on one side and the other on the other side, if there any variance, it will be opposite on each side, and therefore canceled out. I used my mitre square to get the fence as close to 45 as possible.

    The donkey’s ear is scrap plywood, glued and nailed. Again, the most important part is to make sure the angles are as close as you can get them. (Hint, never expect the factory edges on plywood to be either straight or square. That caused me some grief. :~ )

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #124275
    Matt Shacklady
    Participant

    Nice looking jigs!

    --
    Matt

    #137628
    Hugo Baillargeon
    Participant

    Hi everyone,

    Would somebody be kind enough to explain a bit more why we use a donkey ear…? Stupid question, but …!

    Tx

    Hugo

    #137630
    Ed
    Participant

    How does the donkey ear stay on? Is it a single peg pls a wedge?

    (Hugo- A donkey’s ear is for dressing bevels (like http://newtowoodworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/bevel2.jpg or like http://www.leeswoodprojects.com/images/miter_joint.jpg ) rather than miters (like http://www.thecabinetmaker.info/Mitre%20Joint.jpg ) )

    #137634
    Hugo Baillargeon
    Participant

    Thank you Ed!!

    Really appreciate the time and the pictures!

    #137635
    Peter George
    Participant

    @ed
    I used a threaded insert and a knob to hold the donkey’s ear in place.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

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