derek.eder

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #49317
    derek.eder
    Participant

    For the proverbial young person, this situation is fraught with uncertainty. On one hand, Paul and others publish instructions on metal plane sole flattening which appear to accept the process as a fact of life, as is tuning up badly machined frogs. On the other hand, magazine reviews often criticize planes for not being flat and further, with some frequency identify planes with grossly inept manufacturing.

    I guess I should be thanking my lucky stars that the planes are hollowed and not convex (bulging outward) as this is less difficult to flatten correctly.

    #47296
    derek.eder
    Participant

    Dave,

    I have mallet fever too but don’t have any 3″ thick hardwood on hand. I wonder if I should:

    (1) laminate 2 pieces together around the central mortice (i.e., with the joint running verticaly down the middle of the striking face)

    (2) laminate 2 half inch sides to a central 2″ core containing the mortice

    or, (3) stack pieces vertically around the handle like a sandwich?

    Does anyone have thoughts on this?

    #45788
    derek.eder
    Participant

    Greg,

    I have never seen drawings like yours with “proportional notation” (well, yes in new music scores!) Can you point me towards a reference? I Would like to understand the semicircles bridging scale divisions for example.

    Could your drawings (above) magically find their way into a PDF file over on the “benchstool” page? 🙂

    In general, having a drawing to refer to would make it much easier to follow along with Paul while watching the videos sometimes.

    #31286
    derek.eder
    Participant

    For teaching school children, I made 20 or so single-bevel marking knives from old hacksaw blades and scrap hardwood. The 2″ blade segments are epoxy glued into a saw kerf in the handle.

    I had access to a metal shear which made clipping the blades to shape easy. Alternately, I could have ground them or heat the blade to remove it’s temper (and then re harden later)

    One of the American woodworking magazines rated an ordinary X-Acto knife very highly as a marking knife too.

    The photo below shows one knife with a 3/8″ chisel for size comparison. Note the chisel needs honing :)

    #29060
    derek.eder
    Participant

    For teaching school children, I made 20 or so double bevelled marking knives from old hacksaw blades and scrap hardwood. The 2″ blade segments are epoxy glued into a saw kerf in the handle.

    I had access to a metal shear which made clipping the blades to shape easy. Alternately, I could have ground them or heat the blade to remove it’s temper (and then re harden later)

    One of the American woodworking magazines rated an ordinary X-Acto knife very highly as a marking knife too.

    The photo below shows one knife with a 3/8″ chisel for size comparison. Note the chisel needs honing 🙂

    #28585
    derek.eder
    Participant

    Amazon has bundled 3 of Roy’s books in an economical ebook package – although a little sloppily – out of nowhere comes 5 pages from tractor repair manual!

    I know the tractor stuff isn’t from Roy because his tractor has a tree growing through it! (true)

    #28574
    derek.eder
    Participant

    The Tormek system has one flaw – if you use their blade holder and grind to a set angle (e.g. 25 degrees), you have to be very careful to adjust the bevel angle guide for the diameter of the wheel (as it wears down with use). Othewise, you can end up grinding a lot of metal away to establish a new (slightly off) bevel.

    #28573
    derek.eder
    Participant

    I use a Tormek in the school where I teach woodworking to children (up to grade 9) to get planes and chisels back on the battlefield quickly after having suffered the daily insults and injuries of children. I guess I use it as more of a jack plane type appliance than a smoother.

    Several years ago I made the terrible mistake of buying the Scheppach imitation flavored Tormek machine. The Scheppach is a travesty of poor engineering and manufacture – completely useless with its grossly out of square stamped steel blade holder and out of round axle.

    #27233
    derek.eder
    Participant

    An old Swedish saying goes “if you start working with 1 liter of linseed oil, you should end up with 2!”

    In other words, apply very sparingly.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)