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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 105 total)
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  • #553508
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Are the admins here opposed to sales or trades going on?

    Hello Keith. We are not set up for sales and trades in these forums so ask people not to use them for such as there is a lot involved in doing that practically and legally. Thanks for asking though, it is something we will think about for the future.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #553506
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Is there a tendency for it to bind in the cut in some cases? Wondering if it has sufficient set?

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #553406
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Dave, thanks for your help, spam removed. If you write @admin, it pings us a message which helps us find these.

    Also, looks like a great plane.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Philip Adams.
    #553178
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    There is a guide on our Common Woodworking site which also goes over this process: https://commonwoodworking.com/sharpening-a-router-plane/

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #552676
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    We use a Chromecast to cast the tab to the TV in our office, which seems to work well. Certainly improved quality since a few years ago.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #548510
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Hello Mark,
    There is a note in the drawings and cutting list that you need to stick with either the metric or imperial so the measurements are not directly comparable. If we had gone with direct conversions of the imperial to mm, it would have made it difficult for the users of metric, as there would have been no round numbers, as well as it needing stock that is not of a common thickness. Hope that helps.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #541783
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    You will most probably need to whack the back after pulling the plate out, as it will probably result in a plate that isn’t straight.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #533982
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    @mersey,
    Glad you found it valuable and thank you for your kind words. We are trying to do more in this vein over at commonwoodworking.com. It is still a work in progress, but more and more information will be added over time.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #521314
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    @kodi
    I think that it may well indicate initial size of the abrasive, but I don’t know if they have the same way of determining grit size for diamond stones and abrasive paper. The wet & dry paper does loose it’s abrasiveness after not too long. If there is a lot of stock to remove we sometimes go for a coarser grit. We have a large coarse ezelap plate that we use for flattening and the such, and that has held up well so far and still cuts pretty quickly. It hasn’t been used intensely by lots of students, but we do still restore a lot more tools than your average woodworker.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #520920
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    To chime in about wear on our plates that have been abused through various classes and used for many tool restorations and flattening. Those coarse plates certainly loose that initial abrasiveness quickly, but are still in our experience coarser than the other plate. You can generally tell from the sizes of the scratches on the iron when sharpening. They do get less coarse with time, but as mentioned, cleaning is essential.

    We certainly apply a fair amount of pressure once they have been used for a while, perhaps more than recommended. They don’t cut as quickly as new 250 grit wet and dry, so can be a bit slow when flattening a surface as large as the base of a plane or a chisel that is a long way out, or an edge with a large nick in it.

    I think that sometimes the expectation doesn’t line up with the end results, which can be disheartening when you’ve spent a lot on them, but they should last you years.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #520881
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Austin, sometimes the saw plate is seated all the way into the back, so hitting it doesn’t make much difference. In that instance, the best thing to do is to put the saw plate in the vise with the back sitting just above the vise jaws, and use something such as a flat headed screwdriver to very gently lever the back up a little all along the length of the back from both sides. You should be able to get the plate to move out by about 1/4″ without too much effort.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #462431
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Hello David,
    Here are the main differences:
    1. This bench is smaller, it is shorter, only has one side, and is easier to move
    2. This series is more thorough (we missed showing vise fitting last time)
    3. This bench build includes full measurements (you can still adapt it but you have a solid starting point)
    Best, Phil

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #399955
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    If you alternate them, can you squeeze the bow out? I would recommend putting them together and then clamping them to see what you end up with and go from there.

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #399937
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    1. If you look at the top drawing of the inside of the apron, each housing takes the leg and then the wedge to hold it in place. This is why the inside of the housing is slightly sloped.

    2. You could move them closer to the end if you wanted. Paul has placed them where he considers them most convenient for work. There has to be enough resistance on the outside of the housing and other details are effected, but it is hard to be specific.

    3. Paul doesn’t use a tail vise, and doesn’t find it particularly useful, so you would have to make adjustments to use one. See here.

    4. A 29cm apron is certainly stronger than a 20cm one. Paul has tried a 23cm one, and said it wasn’t as sturdy. Up to you.

    We are putting together more information on the workbench, but the best place for now is the information page.

    Does that all make sense?

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

    #370893
    Philip Adams
    Participant

    Hi Guys,
    Wanted to say that we are considering this for the future, but don’t have the capacity at present. Definitely something we want to do.
    Thanks, Phil

    I work alongside Paul to plan and produce the videos for Woodworking Masterclasses

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 105 total)