Cunha

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  • #698541
    Cunha
    Participant

    An update to my last comment.

    Yesterday I tried out a Starrett 3/8 3tpi blade and sliced through 4″ of maple and walnut making perfect 1/16 slices. This blade is drastically different from the wood slicer and olson blade I had been using in terms of drift and power required. I can’t recommend these highly enough.

    I had been planning to upgrade my motor but will hold off now pending more resawing experience.

    I used the SFB model which is plain steel available from Woodcraft in the US. There is also a bimetal model available from Iturra designs.

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 3 weeks ago by Cunha.
    #698516
    Cunha
    Participant

    Jointing is to level the high and low teeth so the first pass may only hit a few teeth. Once the majority of the teeth are being touched by the jointing file you can stop.

    I don’t know of another way of identifying the high teeth.

    By the way, the excessive plate consumption is from overfiling the lower teeth, not correcting the high teeth. The high teeth have not been sharpened as much over time, which is why they are high.

    #698514
    Cunha
    Participant

    You may want to find something to use for winding sticks before doing anything drastic. The two benches aren’t necessarily level or parallel. Also, if the heights are different but parallel the benchtop will rock if not perpendicular to the edges.

    Winding sticks will be the simplest method. If you have a precision machinist level you can test each end and try shimming a beam across the face to see what your difference is.

    Hopefully you are being misled by something that looks worse than it is.

    When you know more, post some info like how much twist, the thickness and width of the benchtop and the material. Your initial question asked if the top could have moved since you made it. If you aren’t using winding sticks you may have put the twist in when you planed the first side. The ability to rest on two benches is probably not the best gauge of flatness.

    #698513
    Cunha
    Participant

    Yes.
    There is chuteing for carcase parts and shooting for carcass parts.

    #693377
    Cunha
    Participant

    I have some paint made by Coronado, which is a Benjamin Moore brand and is sold through BM stores. It’s called Rust Scat and is well beyond the performance of Rustoleum. There is an acrylic version and oil based urethane. I used the oil based version.

    The paint is Direct to Metal (DTM) and will dry extremely hard over time. No primer required on cast iron. For real.

    I bought the satin since I like the look of LN planes but the gloss would be better in retrospect. It’s a cooler black than typical Stanley japanning but not overly so. You could probably throw some tint in it to warm it up.

    Since a quart is a lifetime supply for plane refurbs I’ve used it on outside projects. I painted a rusty umbrella base and I’m super impressed on how it looks after 4 years outside. Also refinished an old square that was paintless from abuse.

    #692116
    Cunha
    Participant

    These are made in the US. You’ll be set for life.

    https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/item/MS-VISE.XX

    #692115
    Cunha
    Participant

    To do resawing you will want more power, 1 hp minimum, and the ability to tension wider blades. I have a 14″ Delta cast iron saw and the tension is probably inadequate for 1/2″ blades. My saw is 3/4 horse and bogs down in thick (8″) cuts.

    The cast iron saw can be broken down into manageable pieces. The motor and stand moving seperately makes that easier. The casting and wheels can be grunted down a set of stairs.

    I pushed my tablesaw aside to make space in my shop. For material breakdown I use a cordless circular saw for long cuts and the bandsaw for smaller. I’ll also resaw for big changes in thickness. The dust isn’t as bad as a tablesaw and I use a dust collector on the dust port to catch the free floating dust.

    #691420
    Cunha
    Participant

    This is very useful information. Does anyone have ideas on how Paul’s standard shellac and wax finish might impact these coefficients. For example, could they by cut in half?

    The coefficients would stay the same but the rate of change would differ. I have doors with layers of oil paint and they still move seasonally.

    Different finishes have different permeability but almost all will pass water vapor. I say almost because epoxy and super thick finishes may actually block vapor transmission.

    #691381
    Cunha
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies.

    My 5-1/2 needs quite a bit of work and I couldn’t see a role for it as a slightly larger 5. If I could visualize its advantage I’d be more excited about doing the work. Primary problem is a fairly convex sole, the worst I’ve seen. Somehow despite its heavy and rough use it has an unpitted laminated iron at 2-1/4 wide.

    I like the fact that my 5 is narrower for roughing. Scrub planes are much narrower so I expected a wider plane to perform not as well. The panel plane use makes sense but I have a 6 and a couple of 7s that I would grab first. These are just my instincts and habits, I have no formal training.

    Larry, I think I may have seen a 2-1/4 iron from Ray Iles. Nothing wrong with Hock irons if that’s the only option.

    #691155
    Cunha
    Participant

    try this link

    THE TOOLBOX OF AMERICA

    #691154
    Cunha
    Participant

    The liquor store that I bought it from showed stock on the internet. After looking around the store for a long time I decided to ask about it. They kept it in the back room and I had to fill out a form about what I was planning to do with it and if I hurt myself drinking it I wouldn’t hold them liable.

    This was at a state liquor store in “Live Free or Die” New Hampshire! They had been selling it for hand sanitizer use but they hadn’t had anyone mention shellac.

    I had never heard of the Polish spirits. Thanks

    #691142
    Cunha
    Participant

    I have used denatured alcohol without problem.

    There are really heavy taxes on drinkable ethanol here in Belgium, so it is not an option.

    I have also used without detectable problems. I have recently bought 190 proof drinkable alcohol because I hadn’t been aware of the toxicity of methanol and the amounts used in denatured alcohol. The cost is far less than my insurance deductible so I’m OK with the cost. Even without the deductible, I’ll pay to save my liver.

    The green KleenStrip has less methanol than other formulas when I checked but I don’t have to worry about gloves and respirators working in my basement with the Everclear.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Cunha.
    #691140
    Cunha
    Participant

    Luckily you are remaking the leg with a big knot in it.

    If you want to make a curved piece, laminating a few layers over a curved form would get you there. I am guessing you can resaw from looking at the photo.

    #691138
    Cunha
    Participant

    Crosscut saws seem to be more common so converting a scarcer saw (rip) to crosscut may not make a ton of sense considering the cost of a used crosscut. Also, rip saws tend to be larger teeth so the pitch may not make sense for normal thickness (3/4″) boards.

    Having more than one saw makes sense if the pitch, set, and angles suit different materials and thicknesses. That is up to the user/sharpener to tailor the tools to the tasks at hand. For instance, I inherited a 4tpi rip which is great for ripping to width but I wouldn’t use it to cut a large tenon. Having a 7tpi works for that. It’s slower but easier to control.

    I also have a cordless 6-1/2″ saw for when I’m not feeling like a zealot.

    #691136
    Cunha
    Participant

    Craig,
    A couple of items come to mind. If you are able to set the cap iron close enough to control tearout it suggests a very subtle camber. If you are trying to remove a lot of material with that setting you will have a lot of problems with clogging of the mouth and a lot of force to make the cuts. It will be very useful for later on in the process.

    A heavy camber will allow faster material removal with less effort but can result in more tearout. Most of the tearout will clean up from subsequent planing but sometimes the bad spots have some left. I had a D2 iron from Gramercy that I brought into service after giving my workhorse #5 to a neighbor. It handles the knots better but not forever of course. I am also very pleased with Veritas V11 steel.

    The other item is that if you have two CVG fir treads glued into a panel, make sure the grain direction on the surface matches in each board. If not you’ll have difficulty at the seam and will have to switch directions on each side of the panel.

    The sides of the boards don’t always tell the story for grain direction. Just yesterday I used Phil Lowe’s mnemonic “The heart points away.” If you are looking at the face of a board on the heart side the cathedral grain will point away from you in the favorable orientation. Looking at the bark side the points would be pointing back at you. The fir boards I was cleaning up had different indications from the side and the face so I went with the face.

    If you have ovals rather than points the board was cut from a curve in the trunk and the grain is in both directions on either end of the oval. Still, the heart pointing direction applies to each end.

    You seem to have a great find with those treads. Pricing on the internet is extravagant for 12″ clear fir.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)