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str8tedge

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 88 total)
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  • #28539
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Thanks Eric for continuing to find out about split pin wedged tails, (and Paul’s input was well appreciated). This appears to be a German method brought to the USA by Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish woodworkers since all of the available examples we have to study are seemingly solely from their use of this unusual technique.

    Whatever you find out through the Amish community would be appreciated Eric. There had to be a well thought out reasoning behind it because so many examples have survived intact.

    Joe B.

    #28473
    str8tedge
    Participant

    I have asked Paul through his blog (if he would) to weigh in on this subject and maybe clarify some or all of our questions regarding the split pin dovetail. I have not found anyone on the net who seems to be able to explain it to my satisfaction.

    Reason lends itself to locking the tails and pins in all directions so they cannot be pulled apart. This might allow for no glue to be used, but most old furniture examples seem to have glue residue present. I believe the tails would have to be cut off of 90 degrees to allow the wedges to expand the pins, but this surely demands further explanation. And, are the pins sawed or chisel split to allow the wedge? How deep etc.?

    Excellent post Eric. We need more problem solving issues raised and hopefully resolved.

    Joe B.

    #27578
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Thanks Dave,

    We’ll have to see how accurate the calculator is with some test wood. Nothing dries uniformly so there will no doubt be a moderate margin of error, hopefully minimal.

    Joe B.

    #27577
    str8tedge
    Participant

    I have concrete flooring which is not ideal for long hours of standing. But with a river behind my garage and a high water table it is a necessity. Rubber mats are good but dampness will collect beneath them if the concrete gets wet from below.

    Concrete is porous remember so it dries out when water is not present. But as you know dropped tools suffer if they slip off the bench on to concrete. It happens. Slatted wood mats are much easier on the feet and legs and you can easily make your own from pallet wood if cost is an issue. You have to pick them up to clear shavings but they are functional.

    Joe B.

    #27575
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Tulip Poplar is heavier and stronger than pine. I personally like the green hues that occur in the wood. If you don’t like that aspect, it cuts, planes, sands and takes a paint finish extremely well and is virtually knot free. American colonists regularly employed it in furniture making and examples of it’s durability are still with us.

    If left to grow to maturity these trees top out at 200 foot tall with ten and twelve foot diameters. I know of one in Connecticut just this size.

    By all means be happy to get hold of some for projects.

    Joe B.

    #27339
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Thanks Greg,

    It’s a nice small hobbyist’s lathe. One of those projects that sat for too many years before I could get to it. I found it unusual to set the drive wheel and head stock to the right hand side. When I tried to set it up to the left side the wheel would be in between the paddle and my push leg.

    Sort of the reverse of a normal lathe set up but it is very easy to use and I quickly got used to it. I made the frame to a height that allows me to sit on a stool when working.

    Joe

    #27161
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Thanks for posting this Scott. So many interesting hand tool uses demonstrated in this film. This is the essence of what Paul is trying to recover with the master class series. Using hand, eye and brain coordinated skills we can make beautiful function-able necessities just as our ancestors did with a minimal amount of tools.

    I own a box scraper tool, but I’ve never seen one used as a plane for boat sides before. Is there a better demonstration (besides Japanese woodworkers) of ‘really sharp’ tools than this. I’ve seen hair shaved with draw knives but that broad ax was honed wicked sharp. No fancy equipment, just spit on the stone.

    And, Wow…Children involved playing outside and watching and learning the process. My, my, how the world has changed. The Beatles song “Get Back’ comes to mind.

    Joe B.

    #26796
    str8tedge
    Participant

    If I can offer some advice. I own a small mill and a 4 or 5 foot diameter log will not be able to be cut by most small portable mills. That is a huge trunk section. It’s got to weigh several thousand pounds.

    As far as splitting it out goes, unless you want 12 foot lengths I would saw it at least in half or more before attempting to drive wedges and bust it open. Get a read on this by checking how straight the full section is. If the bark is twisting around the trunk the wood inside is twisted too. Also, look for significant lumps or bumps in the surface of the trunk. These could be old branch growth or twisted grain inside. If it’s nice and straight I would tackle it. Otherwise call in a pro to saw it into manageable bolts.

    If it’s been outside in the weather most likely it’s got a lot of green wood inside still. Do not! Do not! Chain saw like Mr. Buchanan did in his video. Firstly, he is wearing shorts, no leg protection and he is undercutting with the tip of the chain bar which can kick out and hit your legs. I’m sure he’s a great chair maker but he’s not paying attention to safety in that video.

    A cant hook is a must to roll big logs and your’s will take some muscle to roll and more than one cant hook advised (Helper). Safe sawing means you will be rolling this log over to complete cuts. If there is a split or splits started in the end grain that’s where you need to start your wedges, and you will need a lot of wedges to split something this big. Drive a line of wedges from near center towards the outside perimeter. Then continue along the length with successive wedges. This oak should split out OK but not without a lot of work on your part and a helper.

    If it shows no signs of splitting, bolt it (saw it) down into firewood. That’s a lot of tree and a lot of wood. Unless you have some history splitting big logs, practice on some smaller ones first to see how to work it. It’s not worth getting injured otherwise. Definitely get some help. I have a four foot diameter pine log that ate two of my wedges last Autumn refusing to split (twisted grain) that I will have to saw up this spring instead. This is a large undertaking. Post the site if you attempt this and let us know your progress. Posting a photo or two in advance would definitely aid in giving you advice.

    Joe B.

    #26789
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Wow,…Tim457,….Let’s get Paul to put that box on the build list.

    Joe B.

    #26543
    str8tedge
    Participant

    It’s called “Paying it Forward”. Something we can all do for others. You give so little and gain so much. Hats off to you Antonio.

    #26170
    str8tedge
    Participant

    You might want to include a hand router, or the ‘poor man’s chisel router. A real necessity.

    Joe B.

    #26116
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Very nicely shaped John. Thanks for posting it.

    Joe B.

    #25909
    str8tedge
    Participant

    BD,

    Best suggestion is to post a sketch or two of what you are trying to achieve. There’s a lot of ways to build something like that depending on what you expect it to look like. Type of joinery will be best determined by the design you choose.

    Joe B.

    #25196
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Whitney,

    Everything is well over priced in the wood business today and transportation is a must if you are buying from most suppliers.

    My frustration with costs led me six years ago to purchase my own small sawmill and now I cut whatever I need as required. There must surely be some honest small mills like mine operating somewhere near you. I would check for portable band saw mills in your area and you might get delivery too. Be aware we are talking green boards that will need seasoning but band milled lumber can be cut to whatever sizes you require and is virtually a planed finish.

    Check with tree companies too, they sometimes know the sawyers they provide logs to. Cabinet makers might give you the name of their suppliers too (and might even sell you wood) but then you’d have to shop for price. Good luck.

    Joe B.

    #25193
    str8tedge
    Participant

    John,

    Nice find on the #7. I have big brother #8 and it planes beautifully. You have to eat your Wheaties before using though.

    Joe B.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 88 total)