Tool Chest Episode: 16

Toolbox 16

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The final episode in the tool chest series! In this epic episode, Paul shows us how to glue up the drawer, fits the plywood draw bottom and fit the drawers to the box. He also shows us how to fit some beading inside the top of the box, using a poor man’s mitre box, and various methods of fixing. All that’s left then is a few finishing touches such as the stay and handles.

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40 Comments

  1. George Bridgeman on 23 October 2013 at 3:02 pm

    Almost two hours long! Great work guys. Loving this series.

    George.

  2. bavakian on 23 October 2013 at 3:35 pm

    Wonderful video.

  3. Ken on 23 October 2013 at 4:15 pm

    Way to go guys, great job. Thanks for this one. 😉

  4. bavakian on 23 October 2013 at 5:39 pm

    Anyone recall whether Paul showed how he made the drawer handles?

    • Paul Sellers on 23 October 2013 at 11:57 pm

      That will be a bonus video soon. We have done the filming and editing but we need to slot it in. It’s not really part of the series because not everyone will like the style or want the style. I think you will like it though.

    • Gene Duckett - USA, Georgia on 24 October 2013 at 4:02 am

      Yes, He did not talk much about how the handles were fashioned. Only about the similarity of the through tenon – like the drawer backs.

  5. Boyce Burress on 23 October 2013 at 5:58 pm

    Frame 01:33:02 shows a view of the handle already assembled if it helps.

  6. Matt Hess on 23 October 2013 at 6:26 pm

    Wow, what an amazing series! I learned so much watching this build. As Paul mentioned, each aspect of box building, panel construction and drawer making will translate to so many other projects. Worth every penny!

  7. juryaan on 23 October 2013 at 6:54 pm

    I love these long episodes,thank you

  8. STEVE MASSIE on 23 October 2013 at 9:43 pm

    Another great video Guy’s, this was an excellent series and learned a great deal. I really like how Paul show’s and presents his way of doing things. I can’t wait until I can start mine here shortly but it will be made out of Borg mystery wood unfortunately.

    Steve

  9. Mark Armstrong on 23 October 2013 at 11:37 pm

    Well Done Guy’s

  10. Paul Sellers on 24 October 2013 at 12:00 am

    Again, I should be the one thanking you and all of those behind the scenes friends and family that make this come together every week. Thank you everyone for your wonderful support! I really appreciate you all.

  11. david o'sullivan on 24 October 2013 at 12:24 am

    brilliant. thanks for such valuable insights into fine furniture making with what i believe is the wonderful world of hand tools. i never thought it possible to be honest .would love to know what finish will be used and the idea of a cabinet lock sounds great . would a few coats of liberion sanding sealer look well on mahogany? thanks again Wednesdays are becoming my favorite day of the week

  12. Eddy Flynn on 24 October 2013 at 12:46 am

    A fantastic series, this is going to be my winter project as i forget what the inside of my shed looks like oh well we have to pay for tools some way dont we, greatful as always team

  13. Gene Duckett - USA, Georgia on 24 October 2013 at 4:19 am

    I enjoy these videos so much that I’ve promised myself to watch all the free videos on youtube and read all the blog posts since 2011. All the blogs I’ve read so far, convey a love and dedication to the craft of woodworking To have a teacher that, rather than selling tools, wants to propagate the craft is quite a good motivator. It is nice to know that such good work can be accomplished without a bunch of expensive machinery. Thanks Paul and Joseph et.al. for the videos and hard work of demonstrating and teaching your skills. It is WELL worth the $16.20 USD per month for me to observe and then translate those skills. Every dovetail I cut gets better. Thanks again!

    • humanic on 24 October 2013 at 9:05 pm

      I’m with you. I’ve seen a lot of videos about hand woodworking but, saving a few exceptions, all appear commercial advertisements beside Paul’s ones.

    • Joseph Sellers on 24 October 2013 at 9:12 pm

      @geneduckett we can now accept subscriptions in USD! So, you can save the extra $1.20. Go to ‘My Account’ click ‘Update Payment Details’ on that page explain under ‘Notes’ that you need to change to USD and we will sort it out for you.

      • Bhaskaran Menon on 25 October 2013 at 5:45 am

        Dear Joseph, I tried to pay through Credit Card USD 15 however, it did not accept stating that ‘there was an error’. Besides that, I was charged GBP 1 to the Credit Card. Could you tell me what went wrong?

    • JDykes on 26 October 2013 at 8:16 am

      Gene,

      That’s a good point really… These professional productions of Paul’s work and methods was a value at $15 for 4-5 30 minute videos a month. Doesn’t bother me a whit to spend that $15….

      Somewhere along the line, the video length went to an hour, and, in this case, two hours. While I’m thankful, there’s a part of me that worries that it might not be sustainable…. We were getting an amazing value for our money with weekly lessons from a Master Craftsman – it is something that did not, and DOES NOT, exist anywhere else.

      I’m not sure how to say this without ticking off the group – but, Paul and Joseph, keep reviewing your business model. I’d kick in another few bucks a month to keep this thing going….

      /ducks for cover

      (No personal or professional relationship to the Sellers. Just a poor Soldier stationed in Germany…)

      • MartyBacke on 1 November 2013 at 1:11 am

        Yes, please reduce the length of the videos or charge more. The current value (bang for the buck) is totally unacceptable.

        😉

        In all seriousness, I think the current mix is great. Some of the videos are short, and some long. If they were all kept to 30 minutes, either the projects would never end, or they would be small projects.

        $15 or so a month hits the sweet spot for me. Much more and there would be hesitancy on my part. At least the current dollar proposition had an affect on me deciding to join.

  14. Charles Hart on 24 October 2013 at 6:19 am

    There is no way for me to describe to how much this videos mean to me. Not only the educational aspect but also the quality and character of your work Paul. Each video gives me a feeling of contentment. I was watching this when I noticed on your aluminum clamps that it looked liked you had a piece of wood fitted in the inside of the clamp. If you mentioned this before I’m sorry I missed it, but could you address that again.? My thanks to the whole crew for a job well done!

  15. garyprott on 24 October 2013 at 7:01 am

    I am really enjoying these videos. Have learned more watching Paul then anyone I have ever seen before. Thanks to all of you that put this together. Gary

  16. Eric on 24 October 2013 at 3:41 pm

    I’d love to hear a lot more on finishing. Including ways to finish my pine chest. I didn’t use the most pristine wood, but is’t smooth and sound. I think you often paint them. Would like to hear what you have to say about milk paint, which might make it appear old timey from the start. Thanks for a project with so many different aspects and skills.

    • Philip Adams on 24 October 2013 at 11:41 pm

      Hi Eric,
      We are hoping to address finishing at some level, fairly soon. It’s such a huge topic, with so many different techniques, but hopefully we can do some form of introduction for those just starting out not too far along the line. I know I would find that very helpful (-:
      Phil

      • david o'sullivan on 25 October 2013 at 2:29 am

        that would be great Phil .a badly applied can make a well made project look pretty bad .spent the last 15 weeks making the tool chest and was really hoping that episode 17 would go through this ;however i think i will play safe and go with shellac and wax

        • Paul Sellers on 25 October 2013 at 5:41 am

          Hang in there. We can do this as a freebie somewhere very soon.

        • Paul Sellers on 25 October 2013 at 5:43 am

          ALso, there is nothing wrong with applying a coat or two of sanding sealer to ‘hold’ the surface until a final decision is made. It can be used under any finish anyway and I use it regardless of finish to prep the surface for finishing.

    • harshdoug on 25 October 2013 at 2:33 pm

      Here is a blog post on how Paul painted one of his tool chests. – http://paulsellers.com/2012/08/questions-answered-painting-my-projects/

  17. humanic on 24 October 2013 at 8:53 pm

    I have not enough words to thank you the generosity of his teaching method. I learn so much, and not only about woodworking, also much about personality, temperament, perseverance, and a lot of positive actitudes. Thanks for all.

    By the way, I recommended to my psychiatrist to subscribe to your master classes to decrease his stress level but he don’t understand me, so I suggested him to read the book “Jonathan Livingston Seagull” by Richard Bach 😉

    With love and gratitude,

    –Óscar

  18. Jason on 25 October 2013 at 4:02 am

    Great video and great project. I can’t wait to start mine.

    I’m surprised that you fitted the drawers so tightly, @paul-sellers. Everything I’ve read says to leave gap so expansion doesn’t freeze the drawer. With the friction-fitted lid on the chisel box (I think that’s the video I got that from), you suggest give the box a few days to settle and verify the fit and adjust if needed. On this video you only mentioned it as a possibility, but gave no guidance should it actually happen. Just curious…

    Thanks!

    • Paul Sellers on 25 October 2013 at 5:38 am

      We do cover that I think and I did mention it during filming. I assume it wasn’t edited out by mistake. Just keep your eye on it as the chest acclimates to its final surrounding s and ease as necessary.

  19. [email protected] on 3 November 2013 at 5:20 pm

    Paul and friends. This has been a great series. I am a journeyman cabinet maker, but I left the trade, and sold all my tools 25 years ago, to pursue a career in IT. I am now returning to woodwork and your videos are incredibly helpful in getting my head and hands back in the game. It would have taken me at least a year at the bench to get myself reoriented and back in the groove with what Paul has shown in this and the earlier series.

    I can’t thank you enough for this wonderful resource. The work you’re doing is so incredibly important to the preservation of skills that would otherwise be lost forever.

    Paul

  20. adrian on 19 November 2013 at 12:03 am

    Great tips on fitting up the drawers and overall alignment of the front face edges. Thank you again for leading us by doing all the little things that make the difference between ordinary and fine finish.
    Brass screws can be finicky, I have found by running in a steel screw the same size as a tap, will help too.
    Great Project video as always.

  21. Gary on 9 March 2014 at 9:31 am

    Wonderful series! I’m anxious to begin my own chest. Thanks for another great project!

  22. Michael Ostrander on 30 June 2017 at 5:48 pm

    Great project. Got lots of really great tips here. You pulled together a really solid project from some very difficult lumber. I think about a 1/3 of the into this thing I would have pitched that lot of mohagany and started over. You’re either really frugal or a serious trooper.
    Thanks again for the insights.

  23. Barry B on 10 July 2021 at 9:23 pm

    i just finished making the tool chest, it came out very nice thanks to pauls video guidance. the only complaint is that the top compartment is too shallow for my planes. i’ll have to figure out how to make the next one 1/2 inch taller (dovetail spacing, etc). any one else have this issue with their build?

  24. Barry B on 10 July 2021 at 10:46 pm

    never mind, i figured it out, the bottom panel needed some extra persuasion to seat correctly, now the #4’s fit fine

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