Workbench Dimensions

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #548495
    SeaJay
    Participant

    Hi all

    I’m watching Paul’s ‘how to make a workbench’ series and I’m wondering how you can get wood that measures 2 ⅜” x 12” x 66” (the benchtop) and likewise 1 ⅝” x 11 ½” x 66” (the apron).

    Do I order the wood made to measure or glue some wood together to make up the 12″ and 11½” coverage?

    Thanks all

    • This topic was modified 11 months, 1 week ago by SeaJay.
Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #548583
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    I just spent over £100 on timber for my workbench, and I just realised it’s all rough sawn :/

    What’s worse is that they asked me and I specified rough sawn because I’m new to this and didn’t know.

    Is the wood still ok to use?

    #549674
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    I’m having trouble getting timber for my workbench. Specifically, the exact measurements I need. For example, Paul’s using 1 5/8″ x 11 1/2″ x 66″ (40 x 290 x 1680mm).

    Are there timber merchants who cut wood to precise sizes?

    #549676
    harry wheeler
    Participant

    @harryawheeler

    Mark, if that’s the wood for the aprons, it should be a common size used in construction for floor joists, stair stringers, etc. and those dimensions aren’t critical by any means. In the US, we would call it a 2×12 with actual dimensions of 1.5″ x 11.25″. The shortest 2×12’s we can get are normally 8′ so if I were doing it I would buy a 12′ board to make both aprons. You shouldn’t have a problem finding this at any lumber yard that supplies construction lumber.

    Harry

    #549677
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    To clarify, it is for the aprons.

    I’ve just found a timber merchant that cuts wood to size (in the UK)

    http://www.hancockandbrown.com/timber_products_cut_to_size.php

    At least they let you type in exact measurements.

    Perhaps it’ll be cheaper if I do a search for stair stringers.

    Thanks (again) Harry.

    #549685
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    The above company can only do the size I want with German carcassing wood and they said that’s quite difficult to plane.

    The apron dimensions are: T 40mm x W 290mm x L 1680

    How important is it that the apron thickness is 40mm as Paul recommends? I ask because I can buy the wood I require but it’ll be 45mm thickness. It’s only an extra 5mm but do you think that will render the aprons too heavy?

    #549692
    harry wheeler
    Participant

    @harryawheeler

    That won’t make any difference Mark. Use anythig from 38 to 45mm and you’ii be fine.

    Harry

    #549708
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    Thank you Harry, much appreciated.

    #549782
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    At about the one minute mark in the following video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycflZ6cE-vM

    After setting the gauge carefully and precisely to the width of the chisel he will be using, Paul then proceeds to guesstimate where the two pins will be so that they are centred in the piece of wood he is working on.

    My question is, after setting the pins to the correct width for the chisel, won’t moving one of the pins around so the mortise gauge is centred in the wood, mean that you lose that correct width for the chisel?

    #549783
    btyreman
    Participant

    @btyreman

    the mortise pins cannot move on my mortise gauge, that should be how they are designed to lock in place, moving the gauge should not make the mortise pins move at all, they always stay the same but the stock moves on the gauge up and down, hope that helps.

    #549784
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    @lorenzojose

    I see Paul maintaining pressure on the brass bar with his thumb so the two pins don’t move in relation to each other when he moves the wooden beam.

    Pretty standard. If you fear the pins might move, there are mortise gauges where the pins distance is set with a screw.

    #549793
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    So he isn’t moving the actual pins but the wooden stock/handle itself.

    Thanks all for the help.

    #550155
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    I was hoping someone might be able to show me where the ‘bearer’ is on Paul’s workbench diagram. I’m making my bench slightly longer and wider so I need to cut the timber to the appropriate size. I’ve done so with the benchtop and aprons but I’m not sure what a ‘bearer’ is and whether or not it too needs to be longer or wider to accommodate the different size of my workbench.

    I’ve included two pics of the bench.

    EDIT: I found them 🙂

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by SeaJay.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 1 week ago by SeaJay.
    Attachments:
    #550162
    btyreman
    Participant

    @btyreman

    the bearer should be on top of the leg frames, in between the leg frames and bench top, it’s a piece of wood that overhangs the top tenon on the leg frames so that you can then screw from underneath into the bench and wellboard to secure it in place.

    #570464
    SeaJay
    Participant

    @mark68

    Was hoping for a bit of reassurance.

    I’ve just noticed my workbench top is bowed 🙁

    Top pic is the opposite end of the workbench and it’s nice and level.

    Middle pic is the other end of the workbench and it’s obviously not level. I think it might be due to the split between the wood.

    Last pic, I’ve inserted/glued a sliver of wood to hopefully stop the wood from wanting to close together, as that is what I think it causing the bowing.

    Do I need to be worried, have I sorted it before it gets too bad, is it even due to that split?

    Attachments:
    #570468
    Keith Walton
    Participant

    @keithmw

    i wouldnt worry since its a workbench, it couldve come out better, but im sure you learned alot and it will function fine. just flatten it again if that cup in the top is really bad.

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