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Dave C

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)
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  • #616073
    Dave C
    Participant

    Thanks for the advice all. I hadn’t heard of the Worksharp before, but I guess that’s another thing to consider.

    Having watched some high speed grinders I can see how the dust could get everywhere though.

    I’d be fine with slow shaping/grinding to be honest, as long as it’s quicker and less tiring than using sandpaper on glass I’ll be happy.

    The Tormek does look good, my only worry is that I’d be paying for a lot that I wouldn’t use (since I’d just be using it for shaping/grinding, not sharpening/honing really).

    #553851
    Dave C
    Participant

    @deanbecker that’s a great idea, no-one but me will know 🙂

    #553849
    Dave C
    Participant

    @deanbecker thanks, that was the only use I could think of. I guess it could be annoying after a while, some ply would definitely fix it (but look a bit ugly). Can always see if I can some offcuts from the original apron lying around somewhere.

    @markbannon unfortunately not, it was due to me messing up measuring the height on the bench top side of the tool well and transferring it to the other.

    #553833
    Dave C
    Participant

    Thanks Selva, that seemed to do the trick. I added some spacers to the bottom of the vice where the lag screws attach (I used some spare washers), and this closed the gap at the top right up.

    #520673
    Dave C
    Participant

    Thanks for the advice, good to know I have to plan another trip to the timber yard to replace those pieces!

    #520278
    Dave C
    Participant

    Photo of the 2nd piece with 3 cracks

    Attachments:
    #493954
    Dave C
    Participant

    Thanks for the links/videos/feedback, I hadn’t seen those before. Looks like Paul uses a bunch of work holding techniques that I hadn’t thought about before.

    It sounds like I can go ahead with his bench build and see how it works out, guess I can always add another vise (or tail vise) and holes/stops later if I really need them.

    #425720
    Dave C
    Participant

    I went on a short weekend woodworking course with a heavy focus on improving sawing skills.

    One of the things which we did that helped me a lot was to set up a mirror opposite where we were sawing (vertically 90 degrees from the bench).

    The teacher got us to saw very slowly and to keep checking our body positions in the mirror, and also to keep looking at the lines marked in front, on top, and on the back (in the mirror) very frequently, so that we could stop and notice when something was out.

    Another main thing he focused on was getting us to focus on moving our sawing arm with nothing getting in the way (i.e. making sure it could always move straight forwards and back without being forced to the side).

    Other than that, we mostly just did lots and lots of test cuts on scrap wood, making minor corrections one one thing at a time (e.g. if the cut was out of vertical, just focusing on fixing that, rather than trying to fix everything at once).

    #425718
    Dave C
    Participant

    I had the same issues, and it was damaging the edges on the piece of wood I was clamping whenever it slipped.

    I ended up doing something very similar to you so that I could chop the mortises on my bench (well, it’s actually a table) instead.

    #410582
    Dave C
    Participant

    [quote quote=410518]When you have it fully seated and there is a gap at the back but not at the front, is it square then? If not, then maybe you need to shave a little off the back of the tenon to allow it to sit straight. That is all I can come up with right now.[/quote]

    Unfortunately not – when it’s fully seated, there’s a gap at the back but not front, but it’s still out of square there.

    All I can think is that maybe the mortise was cut at a very slight angle rather than being 90 degrees down?

    #376006
    Dave C
    Participant

    Thanks all for the tips, I hadn’t thought to check for square as I went, I guess that’s obvious now!

    #315728
    Dave C
    Participant

    @ed I was mostly moving back and forth, but just moved to trying circles/figures of 8 etc. at the end to see if that was one of the problems (it didn’t improve things anyway).

    #315727
    Dave C
    Participant

    @btyreman Thanks for the pointer – I didn’t even know that microfinishing film existed, looks a lot less hassle than sticking down sandpaper.

    One other question, how do the micron sizes of the film match up with grit sizes? Lower micron sizes would mean smaller particles which means higher grit?

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 2 months ago by Dave C.
    #315663
    Dave C
    Participant

    Using a sharpie definitely helped me see what the issue was, thanks for the suggestion. I’ve attached an image now, looks like the blade (it’s from a 2nd hand plane from ebay) needs a lot more metal removing to reach the very edge (which still has some sharpie marks on it after sharpening a bit).

    That leads to another question – without a bench grinder (my workshop is a corner of my living room, so no room for one!), is there a suggested way of removing large amounts of metal quickly? It’s taking a very long time even on the coarsest diamond stone I have (250 grit I think). I was also wondering how I’d do that if the blade ever got a nick in it.

    Should I look for a coarser 120 or 80 grit stone? Or move to sandpaper for that? Or is it basically impossible to do without power tools?

    Attachments:
    #315635
    Dave C
    Participant

    That’s a good point – my earlier efforts were indeed better. So I guess I need to try and get rid of that round over (I guess I just keep trying to sharpen as normal and it’ll go away?).

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)