Hand Saws

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 61 total)
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  • #2980
    jespiir
    Participant

    Piotr, there are no stupid questions!

    The “optimum” TPI for a dovetail saw is really depending on the thickness of your board. The rule of thumb is to have approx. 10 teeth in the wood at any given time. So for a thin 5mm board you need a really fine pitch saw, and on the other hand dovetailing a chest made from 25mm material is best served by a coarser saw.

    That said most dovetail saws I’ve seen are in the 15-20TPI range, but you can go both higher and lower.

    So consider the type of work you will do the most and try to choose from that perspective.

    Located in Jönköping, Sweden.

    #2986
    Scott Smith
    Participant

    Check out Bad Axe Tool Works. This guy will custom build you a saw. You just tell him what you need. You pick the TPI, plate width and length, handle and back material. I have a couple and they are very nice. Check out the web site. I am very happy with the saws.

    Scott

    #3010
    rharkrader
    Participant

    I’ve not gotten to use one extensively, but I tested out an Adria tenon saw at a demo and liked the feel of it. Pricewise, it’s between Veritas and LN or Bad Axe. Might be worth looking at.

    http://adriatools.com/handsaw/small_tenon_saw.html

    Rich;)

    #3044
    orkaniusz
    Participant

    Thanks for your advice. For now – I’ve just ordered Stanley‘s 20-500 – I’l see if it works for me.

    #3062
    berber5985
    Participant

    Bad Axe Toolworks makes some awesome saws, but pricey. I finely splurged on a hybrid cut (both rip and crosscut) carcass saw and it’s awesome. I find myself going to it a lot. I also have the Lee Valley carcass saws and I don’t think for the money they can be beat for smaller projects. It’s usually enough for most things however. I also have a 12″ Sash saw I picked up used at a flea market and not a clue on who made it, but it fits my hand nicely and is a good all around size. So check out the used market as well and either learn to sharpen it yourself or send it off to a company and have it done.

    Piotr, I think you’ll find a lot of dovetail saws in the 14 tpi to 16 tpi range depending on the manufacturer. I started with the Lee Valley Dovetail saw and it’s a great user for the price. I’ve also purchased a Lie Neilsen thin plate dovetail saw and I find myself using that more now. But I’ve also heard great things about Rob Cosman’s dovetail saw, bad axe toolworks, gramercy toolworks, and even wenzloff dovetail saws.

    #3075
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    If your wallet is healthy enough for you to invest in brand new high end hand tools by all means invest and enjoy, but there’s no real need to invest a lot of money in tooling up. Especially during the initial stages, as buying wisely tends to play a larger part than buying in any quantity.

    The majority of us (Speaking in terms of craftsmen and craftswomen) tend to accrue most of our tools over an extended period of time and often put a surprising amount of thought into which tools are truly necessary for us to carry out certain tasks. This helps avoid potentially expensive errors, as feel and fit are just as important as function. In fairness to others, it’s often why many time served craftsmen own and use the brands and types of tools preferred by our mentors – Because we became familiar with their kit as we trained – but personal choice also plays a massive part in the equation as technique and personal preferences come into play.

    Keep it simple and you can always expand your toolkit as both knowledge and skills grow and become extensions of yourselves. Work from tool lists Paul suggests/recommends and you’ll not regret your decisions. 🙂

    #3084
    Dave
    Participant

    I was looking at wenzloff saw kits for my saws. Anybody have experience with these saws?

    -Canada

    #3085
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    @dave I haven’t used Wenzloff saws but I’ve heard a lot of good things about them. Chris Schwarz recommends them so if you like other stuff he suggests, they must be pretty decent.

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #3086
    Dave
    Participant

    Thanks! Sorry for sounding dumb but who is Chris Schwarz?

    -Canada

    #3087
    jespiir
    Participant

    Christopher Schwarz has covered the topics of hand tools, workbenches and tool chests in much detail for Popular Woodworking Magazine for many years.
    He is still a contributing editor for the magazine while he devotes a lot of his time to his Lost Art Press project.

    For more info see:
    Chris Schwarz Blog at Popular Woodworking Magazine
    and
    Blog at Lost Art Press

    I would call him Mr Workbench and Mr Tool Chest 🙂

    Located in Jönköping, Sweden.

    #3088
    Dave
    Participant

    Well I have a little workbench I made watching Pauls DVD’s but I am in dire need of a tool chest/organizer. 🙂

    -Canada

    #3091
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Dave,

    Tool chest/box choice depends on utility, i.e. whether tool storage is to be mobile (Taken site to site) or static within your working area. You’ve many options ranging from traditional European, North American and Far Eastern styles/types. I sense Paul may offer details on the tool box build he has as part of his course curriculum, but it may prove beneficial to shoot him a line and ask.

    My preferred choices involve using an elevated tool chest, with additional draw and upright cupboard storage, plus mobile tool storage revolving around a traditional joiner’s tool box with drop front and two integral full length internal drawers. I still work from a joiners box I made during my apprenticeship 40yrs ago, but also have several others in use depending on the task in hand.

    #3103
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    It’s really not a silly question at all. Several makers make saws with 20 TPI. Now that’s generally a silly thing. Most people cannot sharpen saws that fine because the teeth are too small. On thin steel the problem is exacerbated the more; with such small teeth and then thin steel, a tooth disappears in half a heartbeat.
    You don’t need teeth smaller than 14-16 TPI. These can be sharpened comfortably unaided except for prescription or reading glasses normally used. Saws with 14-16TPI will readily cut dovetails all day long with no issues in general. One problem I come across with thinner plate saws is that the tend to buckle in some hard woods when you saw stock thicker than 1/2″. That never happened with older saws such as Disstons, Groves and Spear and Jackson and several others. Saws made by Thomas Flinn are made from good steel, good wood and good brass. The are resharpenable and though they may not arrive ready to go, they can be made into a good saw with 30-minutes of fettling.

    #3105
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    Re tool chests and tool boxes. I do have views on this as i think that they must be both practical and portable too of you travel to do repairs or work as I did in people’s homes, offices and businesses. We hope to follow up the rocking chair with a tool box or two. I have two from my month-long and we made both types last week here in the UK month-long. Here are my US ones:

    #3109
    Dave
    Participant

    Thanks Paul,

    I look forward to the toolchest project, particularly the one with the two drawers on the bottom. I have too many small bits that need a proper home.

    -Canada

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