Hand Saws

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 61 total)
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  • #3110
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Paul Sellers said “Saws made by Thomas Flinn are made from good steel, good wood and good brass. The are resharpenable and though they may not arrive ready to go, they can be made into a good saw with 30-minutes of fettling.”
    Just to add to Paul’s sound advice by saying people should try and not fall into the trap of not personalising tools to fit their hand. This means potentially re-shaping or making new grips/handles to enhance comfort during use, as well as adjusting grind and honing angles to suit their own preferences. You’ll tend to find many older craftsmen tend to do this and not without good reason, as grips tend to be generic in shape/style and blades sharpened in a generic manner too. Whilst suiting some it’s impossible for them to suit everyone’s preferences.
    ————
    Tool box-wise, as apprentices we were taught both styles Paul has pictured (Top loading and front loading) and both are excellent in terms of practicality. Although I’ve made more tool boxes since, I still have the first toolbox I made and – although it’s a little battered around the edges after 40+yrs – it is still going strong and can hold a full toolkit for general site or journeyman work. 🙂

    #3124
    theoldraker
    Participant

    Howdy everyone,

    My thoughts are, you cant learn to play poker without playing. My advice, buy any saw you can afford, and start working it. You’ll learn more from that than any forum post. I got a Diston K-1 its a total pile of a saw in some eyes.Its a backsaw of some sorts. I got it for free, sharpenned it up, and got that sucker sawing. Its not as nice as any other saw thats considered great, BUT, when I actually buy a great saw, I bet Ill know the quality difference. Also, some expensive saw I got off of ebay, and “Old, user” turned out to be a crap stick. Good luck though, and just get something and start getting at it!

    -Rake

    #3217
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    I had some gift vouchers for Classic Hand Tools (UK hand tool dealer – http://www.classichandtools.co.uk/) so used some of them to pick up the Lie Nielsen dovetail saw. I’m all for rehabbing vintage saws (and have done a few) but wanted to experience what a top-notch saw feels like to know what is possible to achieve. It’s absolutely phenomenal! It cuts extremely quickly so was very easy to over-shoot my knife lines until I had a better feel for it. This is the thin plate, tapered version. Tried it in pine, oak and beech so far and performs just as well in all three.

    I’m now thinking of changing the teeth in one of the old backsaws I have so give them 15 or 16 PPI (the LN is 15 but 16 is easier to cut) and see how they perform now I have a good reference. Got some new saw files on order so will joint and re-file a 10 or 12 inch saw once the files arrive.

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #3220
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi George,
    You wont go wrong with a Lie Nielsen dovetail saw. I have used one for a while now, and I love It.
    Good choice, enjoy

    Very Best
    Ken

    #3221
    jespiir
    Participant

    @george: Nice! The LN dovetail saw looks like a real treat 🙂

    Enjoy!

    Located in Jönköping, Sweden.

    #3224
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hears mine, Its a joy to use 😉
    Mmm pic did not upload very well

    #3337
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    I thought I had answered this earlier. Perhaps I do so elsewhere. The main consideration is the size of tooth that lends itself to be sharpened. I think most people have difficulty sharpening teeth smaller than 16 TPI and so the best TPI for a tenon or dovetail saw would be 15-16 TPI. It is handy having a smaller toothed saw and you cannot go wrong with a 24TPI Zona Model saw. This saw keeps sharp for a long time. I have one that OI have used for three years but of course cuts quite small and so will not do what larger tenon saws will do, but you will be amazed at this little saw’s cutting capacity and cleanness of cut. No other saw comes close. It cuts on pull strokes which of course is backwards to me so I jerk it out turn it end for end and put it back. Veritas does make a 20 TPI dovetail saw, which I like and it cuts really well. Nice to have and keep it only for fine work.

    #3339
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    I first used the LN dovetail saw many years ago and have owned one for many years. It really is a nice saw to use. I think it’s a lifetime saw in that it is built to last and best of all is resharpenable. The Veritas too is great dovetail saw and comes in it a very affordable price. As for handsaws, Veritas has not entered that field as yet and and the LN panel saw seems inconclusive as to matching the Disstons and other early makers but I am sure they will. Taper grinding and skew backs were born to improve direction change in the kerf as you cut. Many modern-day panel saw makers have ignored this important development. I think that as far as panel or handsaws go there are enough in the world to go round for decades yet to come and when you find the right one you will love the oldness of it and keep it as a special saw. Few saws match the Henry Disstons, but I also love what Bob Wenzloff has contributed to the world of handsaws. He has enriched woodworking.

    #3340
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Are Wenzloff’s hand saw saw plates taper ground?

    #3831
    DewiCorn
    Participant

    A couple of months ago I bought two saws on ebay – a tenon saw and a panel saw. Although both are straight, free of rust, and have no teeth missing I was disappointed with them, – they were useless at sawing through wood. So I have followed these posts with interest, and had nearly persuaded myself that I “needed” a Thomas Flinn saw.

    A week ago I realised that as the two saws were of no use I might as well try to sharpen them. After about an hour filing the teeth as Paul had shown me I have two excellent saws!

    The pleasure I had from improving those saws myself  now makes them special, – they have something that a new expensive saw would not have.

    #3837
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Nice result Dewi 🙂

    #3839
    juryaan
    Participant

    Mayby offtopic, but any advice on sawvices?

    Lopik - Netherlands

    #3847
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Juryaan,

    I can draw one for you on Sketchup if you’d like me to email you a copy, but I think Paul offered a drawing of his preferred saw vise not too long ago in his blog.

    A few sample pictures can be found via Paul’s blog

     

    #3848
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    If you do one I’ll have a copy please Gary. I have not been able to get onto Paul’s blog for two days now.

     

    Thanks buddy 😉

    #3853
    juryaan
    Participant

    I would love one Gary.

    I am new to forums [this is the first one] so i don’t exactly know how this works,do i give you my email here

    or does it work in another way.

     

    Lopik - Netherlands

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