Replacement screw for Stanley 45 fence

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #121863
    Derek Long
    Participant

    Does anyone have a 45 type 12 or up with the micro-adjust fence? There’s a locking screw on the left side of the fence body at the left small rod for the fence (not the main fence rods, the little micro-adjust rods, and not the adjusting screw in the middle of the fence). Can anyone let me know the thread diameter and pitch of that screw to try to get a replacement at HD or something rather than paying $15 or more off Ebay for a hit or miss?

    Much appreciated!

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 35 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #124502
    James Savage
    Participant

    @j1mmy

    I haven’t got a 45 plane so I can’t be much help.
    Have you had a look at one of these? Invaluable for finding thread sizes.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Metric-Whitworth-Thread-Screw-Pitch-Gauge-TE121-/121298591031?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item1c3df59d37

    Jim - Derbyshire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqF49Zwmzs0

    #124503
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    Thanks, James, but I ruled out Whitworth threads. The diameters and pitch count don’t even come close to Whitworths.

    Unless someone can find a source of 1/2″ 9-32 machine screws, I think we’re out of luck.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #124504
    James Savage
    Participant

    @j1mmy

    Could be a cycle thread (BSC) 7 swg rh, about 2/3rds down the first chart. The dimensions seem pretty close to yours. I’ll do a bit of digging and see if I can help.

    http://www.motalia.com/Html/Charts/cycle_chart.html

    Jim - Derbyshire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqF49Zwmzs0

    #124509
    chemical_cake
    Member

    @chemical_cake

    Thanks for taking the time to reply Derek, and James. Are we talking the same M8, M9, M10 etc. commonly available in the UK, or does the US use a different system?

    Matt

    Southampton, UK

    #124510
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    The measurements match what is called in the US a #9 machine screw as far as I can tell. I measured it for metric with my calipers too in case it was a metric machine bolt size, but it appears to be ANSI/ASME or whatever the US standard is.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #124529
    chemical_cake
    Member

    @chemical_cake

    Yes it’s a silly question now I look back on it. The numbers in metric numbering refer I think to the diameter of the shank in millimetres (I forget what the technical definition is), but more than that I know how big M8 is and it’s probably twice the size of the little screw we’re talking about.

    Looks like I’m going to have to rummage through my grandad’s motley collection of obsolete bolts from his time as an engineer. Unless of course the UK planes were made with metric threads, wouldn’t that be great.

    Thanks again,

    Matt

    Southampton, UK

    #124557
    onstage
    Participant

    @onstage

    Not specific to this plane, but attached is some info on why just one missing screw is a problem when acquiring Stanley planes.

    [attachment file=”Stanley Planes and Screw Threads – Part 2.pdf”]

    [attachment file=”Stanley Planes and Screw Threads – Part 1.pdf”]

    Attachments:
    #124559
    onstage
    Participant

    @onstage

    [attachment file=”Stanley Planes and Screw Threads – Part 2.pdf”]

    Attachments:
    #124561
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    Thanks for that great find. If nothing else, it is a treasure trove of historical research. Someone put a lot of love into that.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #439474
    Yongwon Lee
    Participant

    @gafortiby

    I know this is an old thread, but I have the exact same problem locating the same screw on my Stanley 45 type 12.

    Here are my findings.

    I found that the adjusting screw from my Stanley 54 spokeshave fits perfectly. So I can borrow that screw for now.

    I also found that the thread/diameter is identical to the short screws on the tongue/sash matching cutters on this plane. It is also identical to the short screw that secures a small plate which in turn secures the cutter locking wing-nut on the main body. Unfortunately both of those screws are too short to be used on the fence.

    Based on my observations I wonder if this screw is in fact a 10-28. Stanley may have used odd thread sizes, but they were very self-consistent. Even this odd screw/thread seems to have been used in many different parts.

    Another workaround for those of you that have this missing locking screw: tighten the adjustable fence so that it is fully retracted. Use the plane in this manner, as if it is a pre-type 12 model. This way you lose the benefit of the adjust able fence but you have a solid locked fence to work with while you locate a suitable screw replacement.

    Colorado

    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by Yongwon Lee. Reason: additional information
    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by Yongwon Lee.
    #439502
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    Good information! Thanks. I never figured out the thread type conclusively. Whatever it is, it is not standard.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #439534
    Yongwon Lee
    Participant

    @gafortiby

    [quote quote=439502]Good information! Thanks. I never figured out the thread type conclusively. Whatever it is, it is not standard.[/quote]

    I did try matching it up to every screw I had in my toolbox. As you said it is definitely not a modern UNC/UNF. It is definitely not compatible with UNC 32 (e.g. #8-32), although it’s close. I don’t have a thread gauge so I can’t say conclusively. That’s why I suspect it could be a #10-28, which does not match any modern standard but was used frequently on vintage Stanley tools according to my research.

    Scouring pictures and eBay, it seems that Stanley used two types of screws at this location depending on the production year. Sometimes they are cylindrical thumbscrew with knurling, and other times it is “spade head” (flatted oval) style.

    I just bought some #10-28 screws, will report back once I get to try them.

    Colorado

    #444835
    Byron
    Participant

    @reuser

    Hi Derek.
    I can sympathise. I have two 45s. One is quite complete and in fairly good condition. The other is not, its a donor plane.
    Ive never noticed the threading that you’re looking for the bolt for, but it is there. It’s also not specifically noted in the booklet that came with the plane, it’s shown on the drawings but not mentioned in the list of parts. So I doubt that you could find a donor plane that had that bolt attached that isnt complete itself.
    Alternatively, if you know what thread and size the bolt is, you could buy an appropriate old tap and die set and make your own bolt. Under the right circumstances you could probably get something like that really cheaply. Also, this is probably something that vintage car clubs deal with too?
    Good luck.

    ReUser

    #445179
    Ed
    Participant

    @ed

    If they are still in business, try contacting St. James Bay Tool Company.

    #445287
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    Thanks, Byron. I’ve long since bought a replacement screw. I do still think it would be worthwhile if we can figure out the type of screw so others can go to the hardware store, hopefully, rather than hunt and peck for a 100 year old replacement screw.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 35 total)

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