Stanley No 71 Hand Router

This topic contains 80 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  Dave Ring 3 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 81 total)
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  • #551434

    Tim Ridolfi
    Participant

    Hi Mark,

    Of the choices given, I would go with the finer toothed hacksaw.

    Screw hardness may vary from quite soft (brass) to quite hard (drywall screw).

    Hardness of the material is only one of two criteria for selecting saw blade pitch. The other, and maybe more important, criterion is material thickness. Finer hacksaw blades will better deal with thinner material. More coarse blades will remove material faster, but are more likely to get caught up. The finer blade may take longer to get through the material, but it will work.

    In my own shop, I would just take the screw over to the grinder and grind it off.

    #551435

    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    One thing I had a problem with in fitting a wooden base to my Stanley router was that it ended up too thick.

    When it came to cut the housing dados in the aprons, for my workbench legs, the cutters were being held very near the top and their groove couldn’t register onto the adjustment wheel. It was a pain because the cutter kept moving as I was routing. I ended up tightening the thumbscrew (gently) with a spanner which helped but was worrying.

    I used pine because I had it to hand and that was part of the problem as it didnt seem strong enough across grain to be planed thinner.

    Anyhow, just something to consider if you want to use it on deep dados and start with thickish stock!

    #551480

    SeaJay
    Participant

    I seem to be having a similar problem as you Andrew.

    When I use the hand router on my pine sub-base, it’s not so much smoothing the surface in places, but roughly removing the surface fibres.

    #552769

    SeaJay
    Participant

    I’m still struggling to find wood for my hand router’s sub-base. What do you think about this for a sub-base?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Apollo-Cutting-Board-Wood-Small/dp/B000VKHCTG/ref=sr_1_16?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1539875897&sr=1-16&refinements=p_n_material_browse%3A3027631031

    It’s 300mm x 200mm, so long/wide enough for me to cut it to size and it’s 15mm thick so I think that’s not too thick.

    #552775

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Hi Mark,
    Giving a comment based on some form evidence / experience, always feels good. This household have one of those cutting boards since close to a decade. It has remained perfectly flat, despite the better half’s habit of having it in the dish-washer for cleaning. Withstanding that “abuse” probably speaks more about the beech it’s made from than on the product itself.

    I’ve found this on-line retailer delivering to specification. One meter x 120 mm x 9 mm costs around £19.
    https://www.timbersource.co.uk/

    /Sven-Olof

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

    #552776

    SeaJay
    Participant

    [quote quote=552775]Hi Mark,

    Giving a comment based on some form evidence / experience, always feels good. This household have one of those cutting boards since close to a decade. It has remained perfectly flat, despite the better half’s habit of having it in the dish-washer for cleaning. Withstanding that “abuse” probably speaks more about the beech it’s made from than on the product itself.

    I’ve found this on-line retailer delivering to specification. One meter x 120 mm x 9 mm costs around £19.

    https://www.timbersource.co.uk/

    /Sven-Olof[/quote]

    Hi Olof

    Thanks for the recommendation. Unfortunately they charge over £20 delivery which is too expensive.

    #555694

    SeaJay
    Participant

    I am going to have to buy a sub base for my Stanley 71 hand router. Problem is when I do a search for router sub base, all I get are bases of the electrical powered routers.

    Could someone tell me what exactly I need to type into the Google search engine?

    #555695

    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Paul describes it as “adding a wooden sole” and shows how to do it in the following blog post:

    https://paulsellers.com/2014/10/more-on-router-planes-part-ii/

    FWIW when I replace my not-great pine sole I’ll probably use good quality plywood for its stability and strength.

    I wouldn’t overthink it though: after all it’s just a flat piece of wood with a hole in the middle!

    #555696

    SeaJay
    Participant

    I do tend to overthink things.

    I’ve looked and searched online and I am considering going for a polycarbonate acrylic sub base. It’s the only thing I can find.

    #555697

    SeaJay
    Participant

    Would hardwood/plywood be sturdy enough? I can find that for close to £10.

    #555710

    SeaJay
    Participant

    Ok, I found this site:

    http://www.woodcuttoorder.co.uk

    Shipping is £19.50 and the total is £32.62 and from what little research I’ve done, that’s actually one of the more competitive prices.

    My only concern is whether or not I should go for American White Oak (which is the above) or just European Oak.

    Does anyone have any opinions?

    #555712

    Benoît Van Noten
    Participant

    A 24 X 34 X 0.8 cm polyethylene cutting board cost 2.00 Euro at IKEA (two euro).

    They have other ones.
    In my view, a scrap of plywood would be good enough. If you need a long sole but not too thick, to avoid excessive flexing, you can glue reinforcing ribs on top of it.
    Or, you can put the all router in a recess in a thicker sole (It might be easier to make a thin sole and cut what will be the recess in another board and then laminate them together).

    #555713

    Jim Thornton
    Participant

    [quote quote=555710]Ok, I found this site:

    http://www.woodcuttoorder.co.uk

    Shipping is £19.50 and the total is £32.62 and from what little research I’ve done, that’s actually one of the more competitive prices.

    My only concern is whether or not I should go for American White Oak (which is the above) or just European Oak.

    Does anyone have any opinions?[/quote]

    That seems like a lot of money for what is essentially a piece of scrap wood for a router base. I think this is kind of like what my dad used to tell me once in a while when I was over-thinking things……….”Jim………we’re not building pianos here”! LOL If you’re doing woodworking projects you must have some scrap material around?

    Jim

    If you can't afford to do big things...........do small things in a big way!

    #555714

    SeaJay
    Participant

    I have some wood but not at 12mm thickness. I’m searched online and I’ve looked elsewhere but I can’t find anything. I’ve also tried using the saw to cut it to 12mm but not having a vise and a lack of skill (I’m just starting out), I haven’t been able to fashion a sub-base.

    To date, that website looks like my best bet.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by  SeaJay.
    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by  SeaJay.
    #555726

    Keith Walton
    Participant

    are you able to flatten boards with a hand plane proficiently? especially if you have a scrub plane, you can get something down to thickness pretty quickly since you arent able to saw. use any wood you have. make a planing stop and go to town.

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