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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 68 total)
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  • #617460
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    I have been using a 180 grit Mega Square CBN wheel on a 3400 rpm grinder. A light touch works best. The 180 grit wheel shapes quickly, and from there I can go straight to the coarse ez lap plate.
    Jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #585166
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Antonio,
    Check out TheCrafsMan SteadyCraftin on you tube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLb2vy75h8iOHbmBU1-SF1lddf6Kti8DcK

    He demonstrates several methods for doing photo transfers.

    Jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #555942
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Matt,
    I believe that in the U.K. There is no round over on the construction lumber. I built my bench (US) out of 2×4 studs. If I were to do it again I would buy 2x12s and rip them to whatever dimension I needed for the bench. It would take care of the radius edge and save a lot of work with the hand planes.
    Jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #554096
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    I built a sharpening station cabinet to store tools etc. I decided to use an IKEA butcher block table top for the top.

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #553156
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    I just did a shop reorganization that is working out well so far. The space is 10ft x 20ft and the ceiling height is 8ft.

    I needed to get everything off the floor and avoid leaning stuff against the walls, prior to this every time I would move, things would go crashing to the floor.

    I built a tool wall that is directly behind me as I work at the bench. It houses my saws, planes, chisels, marking tools, drills and has room for more. This has kept my benchtop uncluttered as it is very easy to just put the item back on the wall when I am done with it, as it all within arms reach.

    The vacuum was positioned centrally, the long hose allows me to reach all corners of the shop without having to drag the shopvac around, which is never fun in a tight space.

    Most of the clamps are in a corner where I have a small table that is used for assembly, etc.

    The chest with the drawers contains nuts, bolts, nails, screws, misc jigs and sharpening equipment. I plan on adding a machinsts vise to this chest.

    Wood storage is on one wall next to the tool wall; beneath it I have a work surface that is just a Home depot steel shelving unit split in two with a plywood top. I use it mainly to store parts for the current project.

    The space itself was not insulated when we moved in and in the summers it could get as high as 100F and just above freezing in the winter. After insulating I added AC and heat. Summers I use portable AC and in the winters I use an oil filled space heater that I leave set to 62F. Not a perfect solution but it works for now.

    I do have a drill press and a job site TS in the garage but they are seldom used and need to be put away so that we can park our cars in the garage.

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #313002
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Part 2:

    If you don’t have sketchUp then you can view the PDF of the drawings from the following: site Book Support Files Download the files for Chapter 3 and in the folder you will find the PDF.

    jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #550949
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    You are welcome Ed. I did not thin the milk paint. I did a very very light sanding of the final coat of paint. I used the worn sanding pads for the final sanding, they are very fine at that point.

    Jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #550945
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    @ed

    I used the white foam rollers from Home Depot : https://www.homedepot.com/p/4-in-x-3-8-in-High-Density-Foam-Mini-Roller-Cover-2-Pack-HD-MR-200-2-4/202097450, Wooster and Whizz make similar rollers and I may have used some from those brands depending on whether I was nearer to the paint store or HD when the need came up.

    I am no expert but I was very happy with the end result. I did put on thin coats and lightly sand btw those coats that, and the flat out flat top coats helped to minimized/eliminate any texture. I really love the GF Milk Paint and top coats, they sand so nicely.

    Regarding the frothing, perhaps working the paint too much with the roller might have caused it?

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by Jim Braun.
    #549425
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Hi,
    I recently refinished a built in wall unit and wanted a smooth and velvety finish. I choose General Finishes Antique White Milk Paint and top coated with their Flat out Flat. Once dry these products sand easily. I was going over dark red stain so the sealing and primer steps were important, you may not have this issue.

    General Finishes has loads of how to information on their website. I followed their suggestion:

    I used a foam roller, whizz velour roller and foam brush for all coats

    1. Clean with Scotch Brite pad and 50/50 mix of Alcohol and water
    2. Sand to 150 grit
    3. Two coats of GF Stain blocker Primer sand lightly with Klingspor Ultraflex Sand Pad 220 btw coats
    4. Three coats GF Antique white Milk paint sand lightly with Klingspor Ultraflex Sand Pad 220 btw coats
    5. Three coats of GF Flat our Flat top coat sand lightly with Klingspor Ultraflex Sand Pad 220 btw coats

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    Attachments:
    #419049
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    I purchased two used hand planes from Patrick Leach (www.supertools.com); a Stanley No. 4 ($85) and 5 1/2 ($125). I asked for tools that were in good condition and pre 1960. The tools I received were as promised and ready to go after sharpening and the minimal setup that Paul does to all his hand planes. No rust, cracked totes, etc….

    You can email him or sign up for his monthly newsletter. The first purchase required payment in advance, the second he just sent and asked for payment upon receipt or return of the tool.

    No affiliation just an option for you all. I was frustrated with ebay.

    Jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #325535
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Schenkenstein, With a view like that, one could rock all day. Great looking chair.
    -jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #315477
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Leland,
    If you want to use those hole then you can do as I did, and mount the vise to a piece of oak with carriage bolts through those holes. It worked for my bench top which is made of 2×4 laminations.
    Jim

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #313050
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Very Nice, you have a good eye for what works.

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #313001
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    Just saw a reply from @eckyh that stated the issue might be two links in the post, so here is part 1:

    No personal experience yet as I am still planning my sofa table. What I can offer is that recently I have been learning sketch up via Joe Zeh’s book SketchUp – A design Guide for Wood Workers. In the book he uses a bedside table as a learning exercise; the table uses traditional joinery and the drawer is framed by a top/bottom rail and left and right stiles. The drawer rides on wooden slides(runners).

    You can see this, assuming you use sketchup by dowmloading the free bedside table plan from his site: Bedside Table Plan

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

    #312999
    Jim Braun
    Participant

    The problem appears to the text of my reply. I will send it to the admin and see if they can determine the issue.

    Monmouth County, New Jersey

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 68 total)