Andrew Sinclair

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  • #711962
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    12 tpi is quite coarse for dovetails. You could recut at 16 if it turns out to be an issue. Handy in imperial: 1/16” spacings obvs.

    If so I recommend the vallorbe/grobet needle files, a suggestion I got from Blackburn Tools’ website, theyre excelllent. Havent used them to retooth, but I find them a fair bit better than Bahco 4” xx slims for my dovetail saws.

    #711626
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Thanks Julio and Ken!

    Btw realised reading that I meant PPI not TPI in my message above, oops.

    I think you’re both right, coarser teeth will be more useful for ripping. I’ll probably go 6 ppi as I mostly rip 3/4” stock.

    #710380
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Very nice shaping there Geoff!

    You might need a couple more bolts though?! 😉

    How did you get the rivets off?

    On my list of to dos.

    Cheers, Andy

    #710379
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Nice, all look great condition! May I ask what you paid for the routers, as I’m considering a second one? I’m based in Sydney btw. Cheers, Andy

    #706878
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Those are great Rob, nice one. The painted finish looks striking and really makes the tools “pop”!

    #706875
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    I think you could consider stoning the two sides of this errant Veritas dovetail saw. IF the problem is too much set that can help a lot, by reducing it.

    It aslo cleans burrs on the outside edges of teeth that may have been left from manufacture or your own filing, thereby reducing ripping on the outcut. Worth remembering the outcut side should always be the less seen side of your piece btw, as Paul teaches.

    Too much set results in an overwide kerf, which gives the sawplate space to jiggle from side to side and make the cut wander. It also will lead to slower cutting, which also decreases accuracy and steaightness of ripping.

    To stone you just get a fine sharpening stone and run it from heel to toe along the side of the teeth and the last 5mm of the saw plate. Lie the plate flat on a bench, push the stone flat down on it, and make one or two passes. Minimise the amount of plate you touch as it can scratch, and use light machine oil to lubricate. You could put a sheet of paper on the plate if youre worried, I dont bother. Do this equally on both sides, or if your cut always veers one way do more stoning on that side (veers to right => stone right). Test the saw (by sawing!) every couple of passes, as you don’t want to take too much set off as dovetail saws are a PITA to reset.

    It’s meant to be a good saw, you should be able to get it working with perseverence, and you’ll learn more and be a better woodworker for it, compared to just plunking down dollars for a new saw.

    Actually one caveat here is that 14 tpi is good for dovetails down to about 3/8” (10mm) thick timber. That’s because each tooth is a touch over 1/16” and you want at least 6 teeth in your workpiece. If you’re working in 1/4” thick timber … yes, you probably need a finer saw, maybe a 20 tpi gents.

    Good luck!

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Andrew Sinclair. Reason: fat finger typos
    #706873
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Jeez with that quantity I’d try and get access to a band saw and/or planer and get a big pile tidied up. Partly cos thats a lot of space taken up until you use some of it.

    If the boards are only 12-18” long I might be tempted to try a scrub plane if you want to get 3/4” out of them and you want to start with only one or two boxes. Would be good for your planing technique … and a good workout! Depends how hard and dry they are I guess.

    #664025
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    I’d be a plus 1 for that! It seems a common form of construction that is missing from WWMC. I always look at Paul’s tool storage base units in the older videos and wonder how they’re done!

    I believe he has written a kind blog post in tesponse to a query, detailing the method and/or dimensions, but it’s not quite enough for someone like me. Perhaps the eco bin project captures much of the technology involved – it’s a similar concept.

    Cheers, Andrew

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Andrew Sinclair. Reason: Spelling
    #660743
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    The files are half the battle. Vallorbe / Glardon needle files are the finest I’ve found, and make 16tpi teeth feel large. Whether they’re fine enough for 25tpi I don’t know. I’m pretty sure 20tpi is as fine as my eyes could go without magnification!

    Agree rip teeth all the way finer than 12tpi.

    Good luck, and do report back!

    #660621
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Looks great! What dimensions did you go for?

    This is defnitely on my “to do” list!

    #659473
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Nice details Larry, thanks!

    You are a bit harsh on the camellia oil I think. Just because some manufacturers/suppliers abuse loopholes in regulation should not tarnish the raw product. Camellia oil can be extracted directly from the seeds of the camellia tree, and this has been done traditionally in Japan and China for centuries. No petroleum products need be involved. A nice photo essay on the process is at

    Make your own Tsubaki oil!

    #659140
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Nice one, lovely timber.

    Wonder if the wood was overly dry and thus more prone to splitting. Either due to kiln drying or leaving in the sun or something.

    #659134
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Colin, that’s a really nice design. It looks tricky to me with all those bridle joints!

    Roberto, feel free to steal. Let me know if you want dimensions, but equally it is fun to come up with your own.

    #658998
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Paul’s video on youtube called “restoring the bench plane” is the definitive reference – essential viewing if you haven’t seen it.

    “3-in-1oil” is what Paul recommends and what I use, and it works very well and is cheap.

    I haven’t used camellia oil but I believe it is commonly used on saw plates, where I suspect the cost is negligible because you use so little. I would be interested to hear its advantages relative to 3 in 1 from those that use it.

    Enjoy the journey, hand tools are a lot of fun!!

    #658864
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Looks like it’s got finish on it. This makes the surface extra hard … if so maybe better to cabinet scrape off, or sand with 80 grit, first.

    Otherwise you could try Pauls plane refurb video on youtube. Various issues like sole and frog flatness (and blade back flatness) can lead to issues where you get no shaving until set aggressively then you get tearout.

    Also worth considering (with a straightedge) the flatness of the board you ate planing. You’d expect no shaving on the low spots, that’s actually how a plane flattens boards 😉

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 52 total)