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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 376 total)
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  • #556528
    David B
    Participant

    Mark–It doesn’t matter enough to make issue of it :). The grit on the stones will naturally get a bit finer as you break them in anyway.

    #555982
    David B
    Participant

    Because you are planing off one face into the end-grain of the next face piece, causing tear out b/c the fibers are not supported (hence the sacrificial piece works). Generally you would plane back inwards toward the middle to avoid that problem (from both sides). Probably worth trying a skew-cut or circular cut with the plane to lower the incidence of blasting straight into the end grain.

    #554736
    David B
    Participant

    Nice gesture, Matt! Too bad I don’t live in the area (and seem to spend more time on my lathe these days because I’m so impatient about getting immediate creative gratification)…

    #553500
    David B
    Participant

    It’ll be a beast. Mine is 5′. I’m sure I could put some more drawers and such on it but I’d have a hard time putting the entire surface to work. But, it’ll be a beast that hopefully won’t budge an inch. 🙂

    #552763
    David B
    Participant

    Better than most!

    #552555
    David B
    Participant

    Why is teak out of the question (just b/c it’s not local)? What kind of wood do they use to make sauna’s in Scandinavia(Isn’t that a big thing around there)?

    #552553
    David B
    Participant

    How tight is the blade screwed into the handle? i.e. is there any wiggle at all? If not, why not just leave it intact and try to work the best you can around it–sand down the handle real good (carefully around the nuts) to get to an original surface and then refinish. You could probably polish up the nuts with some Brasso or something while you’re at it. Sand the blade to clean off any rust/corrosion, file down the teeth and re-sharpen? Unless the entire manifest is loose and you can’t do anything about it I’d just try to restore as best as possible without completely disassembling it. But that’s just me…

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by David B.
    #552310
    David B
    Participant

    I just went back and retrofitted my bench drawer with great success. I had originally just made a drawer with no “infrastructure” which resulted in the drawer getting suck, sawing from side-to-side, and generally being a pain to use and something I avoided opening. I went back in and installed runners and such and I cannot speak highly enough of the improvement. And it was very easy to upgrade it to a proper installation. Watch part 1 of the bench drawer customization to see Paul create the drawer infrastructure within.

    #314621
    David B
    Participant

    I wouldn’t think so. I had instant access to everything once I became a paying member. The only caveat is that you cannot download full episodes of projects that existed prior to your membership activation (for perfectly rational/logical reasons). Perhaps you just need to update some personal information to complete your upgrade process?

    #552126
    David B
    Participant

    Highland Woodworking does not have many Auriou rasps left. I looked at some earlier this year and actually ended up buying a Narex over the Auriou selection they had in stock because I seemed to be a better fit to it (I guess). It may have been that the coarseness I was seeking in an Auriou was not available in the limited stock they had on hand. I just felt like the Narex was taking fuller cuts and leaving an equally good surface. btw, just so I’m clear, I didn’t buy the Narex because it was cheaper (like $95 vs. $115 so not really a “bargain”). Had I known that Aurious would continue to become more difficult to acquire, maybe I would’ve thought twice.

    #550776
    David B
    Participant

    Nice. Is the purple heart laminated (I think I might see a joint line) or did you find a piece that wide?

    #550655
    David B
    Participant

    One of the regrets of my bench is the 2 dog holes I drilled which are little more than dust collection holes where things might get lost. Given the trick of using the vise with other clamps, dogs almost seem completely unnecessary for the things I do.

    Also, Tom, your workshop looks like a museum. If only I could keep mine so tidy!

    #550614
    David B
    Participant

    The depth gauge and beading stop are both there. They show in one of the photo’s. I wish there was some way to avoid that “birds nest” buildup too, but it just happens with all the plough planes. Just be careful that none of that material gets between fence and the work piece. If you push it too far without removing the shavings, it will clog up to the point that yoh have to remove the cutter to get the waste out.

    Where are you seeing them? Either I’m blind or I’m looking at a different set of photos! I just see the rods and the fence that slides on them.

    #550606
    David B
    Participant

    Congrats on the plane, Kirsty. I have a couple of those that I got on eBay when I was hell bent on getting a plough plane. My biggest complaint (but something that these planes are all prone to) is how easily and frequently the mouth gets clogged and must be cleared. If you follow Paul’s technique (start near the front and work your way back before trying to take a full-length shaving), they are not difficult to use.

    That all said, your plane appears to be missing the depth stop. It’s nothing more than a short piece of metal with a perpendicular pin that comes out and screws into the hole where the thumb-screw is on the right-hand side. It looks like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/STANLEY-45-OR-55-COMBINATION-PLANE-SLIDING-SECTION-DEPTH-STOP-N-O-S-UNUSED/222025025076?hash=item33b1b90634:g:WbkAAOSwDuJWwifY. But $25 is a lot to pay for that part!

    Also, as it pertains to your question about keeping hand tools in the garage (I live in Atlanta, GA which is very hot and humid during the summer months), I keep all of mine there and while I’ll notice if something that hasn’t been used in a while is showing any rust or whatnot, I’ll just nip it in the bud on the fly. My mental rationalization is that if I’m regularly doing woodwork in the garage, my regular use and maintenance of the tools will keep them in good operating condition. I think I’d be more concerned if I lived say, by the ocean, where the corrosive salt in the air seems to present a more clear and present danger to steel.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by David B.
    #550546
    David B
    Participant

    I purchased, restored, and re-sold (for nary a profit) a Lakeside jack plane I got off ebay. I did not like the way it performed at all–it seemed “loose”. Maybe it was beyond a meaningful tune-up. The cap iron did not seem particularly solid/stable and the tote jiggled. I’m no collector so if I don’t like the way it performs I probably won’t keep it.

    On the other hand, I have a Sargent #4 I got off ebay for $20 because I thought it was a brand collectors seemed to approve of. When I got it I was disappointed to find the tote/knob are made from a black-resin material and the screws are steel-headed, Philips-head screws. Otherwise it could be so pretty–I think I have some spare Stanley hardware about. But then the plane truthfully performs beautifully. If not for the resin and screw heads I would smile so much wider when I grab it. Is it possible to craft a new tote for this vintage of Sargent plane–it has a plastic nub at the front of the tote for stability vs. a screw. Are the screw angles/lengths the same as a Stanley #4? I have some spare hardware but the tote has a different form…

    Whoops–sorry to hijack the thread (pun intended):O

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 376 total)